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Sunday 18 November 2018

Only 53 BVD-positive animals remain in Ireland - see where they are

No BVD-positive animals alive in Louth, Dublin, Wicklow, Carlow and Wexford

Dairy calves. Picture: Garry O'Neill
Dairy calves. Picture: Garry O'Neill
FarmIreland Team

FarmIreland Team

Results on the national BVD eradication programme by the end of September 2018, shows that significant progress toward eradication has been made and just 53 BVD-positive animals remain in Ireland, new figures from Animal Health Ireland (AHI) show.

With just over 2.11m calves tested, representing approximately 90pc of the anticipated calf crop for the year, the prevalence of persistently infected (PI) births continues to decline each year, with only 0.05pc of calves tested in the year being found to be persistently infected with BVDV (as compared to 0.10pc in 2017), with these being located in 1pc of 83,000 breeding herds (compared to 2pc in 2017).

Figures up to October 8 show that only 53 PIs of the 1,115 born this year are still alive. While the majority of these were born in August and September, there are a small number of older PIs still alive, the oldest being born in December 2017.

Substantial improvements have also been made in reducing the extent to which PIs are retained on farm. Figures up to October 8 show that only 53 PIs of the 1,115 born this year are still alive. While the majority of these were born in August and September, there are a small number of older PIs still alive, the oldest being born in December 2017.

Based on this progress, there are no PI animals alive in the following counties: Louth, Dublin, Wicklow, Carlow and Wexford. Furthermore, only 12 herds are currently retaining PIs for more than five weeks after their initial test result.

According to AHI, it is critical to the programme that all calves are tested promptly and all PIs are removed as soon as possible after identification and are isolated until this is done. Details of the small proportion of animals with an overdue test have been sent to the relevant herds in the last month, requiring herd owners to have samples submitted from these animals.

Herdowners can also identify untested animals on the ICBF database.

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