Farm Ireland
Independent.ie

Sunday 15 July 2018

Turkey could take 100,000 Irish cattle per annum

This 865kg April 2005 Charolais X bullock sold for €2,300 at the 50th anniversary sale in Kilcullen Mart. Photo Roger Jones.
This 865kg April 2005 Charolais X bullock sold for €2,300 at the 50th anniversary sale in Kilcullen Mart. Photo Roger Jones.
Louise Hogan

Louise Hogan

TURKEY has an import requirement for 500,000 head of live cattle each year and Ireland could supply up to 100,000 head on an annual basis, said IFA National Livestock Chairman Angus Woods following an IFA and Bord Bia meeting with Turkish officials in Ankara last week.

There are a number of consignments currently being assembled for Turkey by Irish exporters, with further shipments anticipated over the coming months. To date this year, almost 17,000 Irish cattle have been exported to Turkey. Almost 20,000 head in autumn 2016.

Mr Woods said the Turkish authorities recognised the high quality of Irish livestock.

“Turkey wants to develop the trade with Ireland and it is very important that this is fully facilitated in every way. We discussed how we can increase supplies from Ireland by matching our seasonal production with the Turkish specification requirements.

"We also discussed various issues around weight, age and quarantine requirements.”

The delegation discussed all aspects of animal welfare with the official veterinarians in the Department of Agriculture and it is clear that this is a very important issue for the Turkish authorities.

Joe Burke, Livestock Manager with Bord Bia, made a presentation to the Turkish authorities on the beef and livestock sector in Ireland.

He emphasised the high quality of the progeny from the Irish suckler beef herd and the work at farm level to further improve genetics.

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Turkey has also become a key market for exports of Irish beef genetics, taking an estimated 400,000 AI straws from Ireland this year.


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