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Health-conscious consumers prefer 'Blondes'

Blonde D'Aquitane is a minority beef breed in this country, but that's changing due to the quality of its beef and demand from live exporters, reports Martin Ryan

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Glory days: Ballinascraw Glory, a Blonde d’Aquitaine cow that has earned many show honours, including the breed championship at the National Show in Tullamore in 2012, 2013 and 2015

Glory days: Ballinascraw Glory, a Blonde d’Aquitaine cow that has earned many show honours, including the breed championship at the National Show in Tullamore in 2012, 2013 and 2015

Breeder John Lynch, who has been breeding Blondes on his Co Longford farm since the early 1990s

Breeder John Lynch, who has been breeding Blondes on his Co Longford farm since the early 1990s

John Lynch with one of the top Blondes bred in the Ballinascraw Herd, an 18-month old son of French bull, Aramis, weighing 850kg

John Lynch with one of the top Blondes bred in the Ballinascraw Herd, an 18-month old son of French bull, Aramis, weighing 850kg

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Glory days: Ballinascraw Glory, a Blonde d’Aquitaine cow that has earned many show honours, including the breed championship at the National Show in Tullamore in 2012, 2013 and 2015

The low-cholesterol quality of its meat is becoming an distinct advantage for the Blonde d'Aquitaine breed in Ireland, according to breeder John Lynch.

John's herd of Blondes, for which he has earned many honours over the past three decades, mingle with his award-winning pedigree Limousin herd and flock of pedigree Vendeen sheep on the family farm in Ballinascraw, Co Longford.

The foundation of the Blonde d'Aquitaine herd on the farm near Ballinalee was the purchase of a female, Fifi, from Mrs Fallon's herd in Wexford in the early 1990s.