Farming

| 9.5°C Dublin

Awards the springboard for success inventors crave

Close

Left:  Maeve O’Keeffe’s impressively finished Turn Over Hoof Pairer won first prize in Class 900 at last year’s Inventions Competition. Quicker than conventional methods, this invention improves efficiency when hoof pairing as you can examine all four feet at the same time. Health and safety are improved both for the cow and the operator and it is worked hydraulically so no physical effort is required. There is less stress on the hoof pairer’s back as the animal’s four feet are at waist height . Right: KNOCKOUT: The KO Doser by Longford man Vincent Kiernan is a one-man animal restrainer for dosing cattle that came about after Mr Kiernan suffered a ligament injury when a bullock hurt his hand during dosing. A special clutch in the ratchet as shown prevents the animal’s head from suddenly jerking up or down and causing an injury to the farmer. Mr Kiernan won second prize in Class 900 last year and was rewarded with a cheque for €200

Left: Maeve O’Keeffe’s impressively finished Turn Over Hoof Pairer won first prize in Class 900 at last year’s Inventions Competition. Quicker than conventional methods, this invention improves efficiency when hoof pairing as you can examine all four feet at the same time. Health and safety are improved both for the cow and the operator and it is worked hydraulically so no physical effort is required. There is less stress on the hoof pairer’s back as the animal’s four feet are at waist height . Right: KNOCKOUT: The KO Doser by Longford man Vincent Kiernan is a one-man animal restrainer for dosing cattle that came about after Mr Kiernan suffered a ligament injury when a bullock hurt his hand during dosing. A special clutch in the ratchet as shown prevents the animal’s head from suddenly jerking up or down and causing an injury to the farmer. Mr Kiernan won second prize in Class 900 last year and was rewarded with a cheque for €200

MODEL STUDENT: Last year, enterprising 14-year-old student Ciarán Byrne from Geashill in Co Offaly won an award for his farm machinery model-making business. Mr Byrne’s model of a Broughan bale trailer attracted lots of attention for its neat finishing. See Ciarán Byrne Models on Facebook

MODEL STUDENT: Last year, enterprising 14-year-old student Ciarán Byrne from Geashill in Co Offaly won an award for his farm machinery model-making business. Mr Byrne’s model of a Broughan bale trailer attracted lots of attention for its neat finishing. See Ciarán Byrne Models on Facebook

EASY MOVER: Young designer Thomas Kenny’s simple but clever Calf Barrow does exactly what it says on the tin, taking the hard work out of handling hundreds of new calves each season. It has a low entry point and is balanced to ensure the calf is easy to move for farmers working on their own

EASY MOVER: Young designer Thomas Kenny’s simple but clever Calf Barrow does exactly what it says on the tin, taking the hard work out of handling hundreds of new calves each season. It has a low entry point and is balanced to ensure the calf is easy to move for farmers working on their own

LIFESAVER: Gráinne O’Dwyer’s PTO farm safety device, which won the student category two years ago, is currently being used at farm level on her father’s Massey Ferguson tractor and Rossmore slurry tanker

LIFESAVER: Gráinne O’Dwyer’s PTO farm safety device, which won the student category two years ago, is currently being used at farm level on her father’s Massey Ferguson tractor and Rossmore slurry tanker

/

Left: Maeve O’Keeffe’s impressively finished Turn Over Hoof Pairer won first prize in Class 900 at last year’s Inventions Competition. Quicker than conventional methods, this invention improves efficiency when hoof pairing as you can examine all four feet at the same time. Health and safety are improved both for the cow and the operator and it is worked hydraulically so no physical effort is required. There is less stress on the hoof pairer’s back as the animal’s four feet are at waist height . Right: KNOCKOUT: The KO Doser by Longford man Vincent Kiernan is a one-man animal restrainer for dosing cattle that came about after Mr Kiernan suffered a ligament injury when a bullock hurt his hand during dosing. A special clutch in the ratchet as shown prevents the animal’s head from suddenly jerking up or down and causing an injury to the farmer. Mr Kiernan won second prize in Class 900 last year and was rewarded with a cheque for €200

IN ALL, around 60 different inventions were presented last year, and the top honour in Class 900 – Inventions in Agriculture, Forestry and Horticulture – went to Maeve O'Keeffe from Mallow, Co Cork for her Turn Over hoof pairing crate.

The judges noted how the finish on this invention was exemplary, and Ms O'Keeffe had clearly taken her idea all the way from a concept on paper right through to the final product ready for market. She was presented with the Winner's Cup and a cheque for €300, but it is the product recognition and publicity of winning the Cup that will no doubt be of most value going forward.

I think what makes many of the inventions on display stand apart was that they came about as a result of personal experience. The inventor's story was often as interesting as the new idea itself.

To this end, another item that caught my eye last year was Vincent Kiernan's invention called the KO Doser.

This is a one-man animal restrainer for dosing cattle that came about after Mr Kiernan suffered a ligament injury when a bullock hurt his hand during dosing.

I liked Thomas Kenny's simple but clever Calf Barrow last year as well, which does exactly what it says on the tin, taking the hard work out of handling hundreds of new born calves each season.

The Tullamore Show crew are always keen for more students to participate in the inventions competition. And if the calibre of entries is anything like previous years, punters attending the show looking for handy farm inventions certainly won't be disappointed.

Potential

Two years ago the very worthy winner of the student invention award in Class 901 (Inventions in Agriculture, Horticulture and Forestry) was the then 15-year-old Thurles Presentation secondary school student Gráinne O'Dwyer.

Ms O'Dwyer, who comes from a dry stock farm in Urlingford in Tipperary, came up with a really clever device that has great potential to save lives on farms. Her pto shaft safety invention uses a motion sensor to detect movement at the back of the tractor when the pto shaft is engaged. Once the movement is detected, it automatically turns off the drive to the pto shaft. The system has been proven on the O'Dwyer farm to work with a tractor that has electronic solenoid engagement of the pto shaft drive.

Ms O'Dwyer came up with the idea of a sensor through her farming background, since she was well aware of the problems of pto shaft dangers on the home farm. She set about finding a solution that was easy to install, relatively cheap and reliable.

Neighbours have been flocking to the farm to see the invention and make enquiries about when the device will be available to buy. Banks have been offering finance and the Health and Safety Authority have also commended the idea.

All in all, it's easy to see how winning an award and gaining recognition at the Tullamore Inventions Competition could provide the springboard for success that every young inventor craves.

Farming Newsletter

Get the latest farming news and advice every Tuesday and Thursday.

This field is required


Most Watched





Privacy