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Tuesday 11 December 2018

'Farming organisations need to step up and challenge glyphosate restrictions'

Speaking at the ‘Shaping the Vision for Ireland’s Agri-Food Industry 2030’ conference organised by Ceres, a new women in agri-business network, in the Convention Centre, Dublin today, Lucinda Creighton of Vulcan Consulting. Picture: Pat Moore
Speaking at the ‘Shaping the Vision for Ireland’s Agri-Food Industry 2030’ conference organised by Ceres, a new women in agri-business network, in the Convention Centre, Dublin today, Lucinda Creighton of Vulcan Consulting. Picture: Pat Moore
Margaret Donnelly

Margaret Donnelly

The future of glyphosate needs to be challenged by farming organisations, according to consultant Lucinda Creighton.

Creighton of Vulcan Consulting was speaking at the inaugural Ceres conference 'Shaping the Vision for Ireland's Agri-Food Industry 2030' and said that one report has had a massive impact on the future of glyphosate.

"One report and a very effective campaign by certain NGOs were allowed to gain traction and gather huge political momentum."

She said it was now time for farming organisations to "step up and challenge this or there will be more and more non-science based restrictions on agriculture".

She said that three quarters of EU Member States want glyphosate to be licensed but they don't have the courage to vote for it.

Creighton also warned attendees to be prepared for all possible outcomes from the ongoing Brexit negotiations.

"Ireland’s agri-food businesses need to prepare and act now. Ignore the sound-bites and assume the worst to put yourself in the best position to survive. With the British government devoid of any rational thinking or coherent planning, the onus is on the Irish agri-food industry, along with the Irish Government, to make up for that and start planning ahead for every eventuality, including a 'no deal' scenario," she said.

Senior members of the Irish agri-food industry were urged not to be complacent when it comes to meeting the ongoing challenges for the sector and to consider the development of a 'National Food Strategy'.

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The event was organised by Ceres, a new women in agri-business network, which aims to develop and promote leadership and diverse thinking within the industry.


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