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From war to wild weather, global crop problems point to years of high food prices

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A French farmer harvests his field of barley during sunset in Aubencheul-au-Bac, northern France, June 28, 2022. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

A French farmer harvests his field of barley during sunset in Aubencheul-au-Bac, northern France, June 28, 2022. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

Truckers take part in a protest blocking the Puente Pueyrredon bridge, against the shortages and rising prices for diesel fuel, just as the country's crucial grains harvest requires transport amid surging inflation, in Buenos Aires, Argentina June 28, 2022. REUTERS/Agustin Marcarian

Truckers take part in a protest blocking the Puente Pueyrredon bridge, against the shortages and rising prices for diesel fuel, just as the country's crucial grains harvest requires transport amid surging inflation, in Buenos Aires, Argentina June 28, 2022. REUTERS/Agustin Marcarian

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A French farmer harvests his field of barley during sunset in Aubencheul-au-Bac, northern France, June 28, 2022. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

Eric Broten had planned to sow about 5,000 acres of corn this year on his farm in North Dakota, but persistent springtime rains limited him to just 3,500 in a state where a quarter or more of the planned corn could remain unsown this year.

The difficulty planting corn, the single largest grain crop in the world, in the northern United States adds to a string of troubled crop harvests worldwide that point to multiple years of tight supplies and high food costs.


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