Thursday 22 August 2019

Ergo: Every little helps as Tesco signs up to corporate equality club

Carol Andrews, 30% Club Ireland Country lead and a managing director at BNY Mellon Ireland, with Kari Daniels, CEO, Tesco Ireland. Photo: Naoise Culhane Photography
Carol Andrews, 30% Club Ireland Country lead and a managing director at BNY Mellon Ireland, with Kari Daniels, CEO, Tesco Ireland. Photo: Naoise Culhane Photography

Ensuring gender diversity among top leadership positions has always been a struggle for Irish companies.

And that was very much in evidence in the Central Statistics Office's first gender diversity study, which was published in May.

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It pointed out that just one in nine CEOs in Irish businesses are women. The survey revealed that women occupied just 28pc of senior executive roles.

The CSO was also quick to note that women accounted for just a fifth of all positions on boards of directors. A similarly low level of representation can be found among chairpersons, where 7pc are female.

Such low statistics has spurred a whole host of initiatives to get more women into the higher echelons of business.

Among the most prominent of them is the 30% Club. Set up in 2010, the club believes that better representation of women on boards not only encourages better leadership and governance, but also results in better all-round board performance. It aims to help companies accelerate their growth towards more diversified leadership positions.

Ergo notes that Tesco Ireland is the latest to join the initiative's Irish chapter, becoming its 250th member.

Tesco's Irish arm already boasts a 40pc female representation on its leadership team.

Tesco Ireland CEO Kari Daniels said: "The drive for diversity and inclusion is a huge part of our identity as a company and we believe it helps us deliver our purpose of serving shoppers a little better every day."

Credit where it's due for Chase Bank's giveaway

Credit card debt is always an unwelcome guest. Looming in the background of your personal finances it can range from a mild annoyance to an overbearing burden.

Irish card users often dream of a day where the slate is wiped clean. Where the days of excess or necessity are forgiven. Where the decision to splurge on those shoes or that watch didn't sting as badly as it has.

Well, Ergo notes that Irish customers must look on with great envy at the goings-on in Canada.

Chase Bank is forgiving all outstanding debt owed by customers of its two Canadian credit cards as it exits the country's market.

The move, which has happened after 13 years in the country, has left customers 'over the moon'. Irish card users are pinning their hopes on whatever shooting stars they can see to help repeat the trick.

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