Saturday 24 August 2019

Criminals using social media to trick customers into sharing personal bank details - Head of the Garda National Cyber Crime Bureau

Michael Gubbins Garda Cyber Crime Bureau at the 2018 Information Sec in the RDS
Gavin McLoughlin

Gavin McLoughlin

Criminals are using social media to check when customers are contacting banks about problems, and then posing as the bank in order to hack people's data.

That's according to the head of the Garda National Cyber Crime Bureau, who said the gardai have had multiple incidents of this activity reported to them.

Det Supt Michael Gubbins said cyber crimes will become increasingly stealthy and hard to detect in the coming years.

One example could be the increasing use of so-called fileless malware, where malware doesn't sit on a computer's hard drive but in its RAM, a temporary storage part of the computer where the malware is harder to detect.

He said businesses need to educate their employees to be conscious of cyber security best practice. "It's not all about technology or having the best IT equipment, because it doesn't capture everything," he added. "Co-operation among all relevant actors is key."

Det Supt Gubbins was speaking at Dublin InfoSec 2018, a cyber security event organised by Independent News & Media.

Earlier at the event, 'People Hacker' and hunter in Channel 4's 'Hunted', Jenny Radcliffe told the crowd that human beings are the biggest vulnerability in a company's cybersecurity defences.

She said most hackers use some element of "social engineering" in their schemes - trying to deceive or manipulate people into handing over the information the hacker is seeking.

"It's effective, and it gets around the firewalls, the anti-malware and the defences we put on place," she said.

"If we don't demystify [what's going on in the brain of a hacker] people won't know what they are faced with".

Dublin InfoSec 2018 was opened by Justice Minister Charlie Flanagan, who said cooperation between the private sector and the authorities was essential to tackle cyber criminals.

He said the Government is developing a new national cyber security strategy due to be published early next year.

"The incidence of cybercrime in Ireland has significantly increased...this represents an obvious concern for Ireland's digital economy and for investors looking at Ireland as a business destination."

MInister for Justice Charlie Flanagan TD pictured with INM Group Managing Editor Ed Mc Cann, INM’s Technology Editor Adrian Weckler and Michael Gubbins of the Garda Cyber Crime Bureau at the opening of the 2018 Information Sec in the RDS
MInister for Justice Charlie Flanagan TD pictured with INM Group Managing Editor Ed Mc Cann, INM’s Technology Editor Adrian Weckler and Michael Gubbins of the Garda Cyber Crime Bureau at the opening of the 2018 Information Sec in the RDS

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