Monday 19 August 2019

First Look: Dublin City Council gives green light for former Clery's building

A peek at the proposed development for Clery's Building
A peek at the proposed development for Clery's Building
A peek at the proposed development for Clery's Building
A peek at the proposed development for the Clery's building
Ronald Quinlan

Ronald Quinlan

Dublin City Council has granted planning permission to Clery’s new owners, Natrium, to proceed with proposals for a new mixed-use development on the site of the former O’Connell Street department store.

The development will comprise of offices, retail units, leisure facilities and a boutique hotel.

While council planners have attached 28 conditions to their approval for the redevelopment of the historic Clery’s premises, Natrium chief Deirdre Foley expressed her satisfaction at the decision.

Speaking to Independent.ie, Ms Foley said: “I’m delighted that Dublin City Council has given us this phenomenal opportunity to help in the regeneration and redevelopment of this iconic building and to be a major catalyst for bringing O’Connell Street back to its former glory and the historic centre of the city.”

A peek at the proposed development for the Clery's building
A peek at the proposed development for the Clery's building

Quite apart from the redevelopment and reconfiguration of the interior of the existing Clery’s building into offices and retail units, Natrium intends to create what it describes as a “rooftop destination” area consisting of restaurants, bars and entertainment spaces with views of Dublin city and Dublin Bay.

The company also aims to reinvigorate Earl Place, which currently operates as a service lane, into a new street populated by retail units and a pedestrian area for shoppers.

A peek at the proposed development for Clery's Building
A peek at the proposed development for Clery's Building

Commenting on the receipt of planning permission for the project, lead architect for the scheme, Finghin Curraoin of Henry J. Lyons Architects expressed his firm’s determination to restore Clery’s building to its former grandeur.

He said: “As a practice we’re looking forward to working on this incredibly interesting project which will include the reinstatement of some remarkable and unique architectural features such as the restoration and cleaning of the Portland Stone facades, renovation of the Clerys Tea Rooms and feature staircase.”

Natrium said in a statement it intends to work with Dublin City Council and others to ensure the Clerys redevelopment delivers “significant economic benefits for north inner city Dublin”, maximising local employment and apprenticeship opportunities in the process.

“The development will lead the way in the regeneration of O’Connell Street and deliver 1,073 jobs during the construction phase and 2,500 people once operational.

Natrium will work with all stakeholders necessary to ensure there is no delay in making these thousands of much needed jobs a reality,”

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