Sunday 25 August 2019

Clerys to be redeveloped despite objections

A peek at the proposed development for Clery's Building
A peek at the proposed development for Clery's Building
Ronald Quinlan

Ronald Quinlan

The new owner of Clerys has been granted planning permission for its redevelopment despite the objections of former workers who lost their jobs suddenly last year after the landmark department store suddenly changed ownership.

Dublin City Council has granted planning permission to the new owner of Clerys, Natrium, to proceed with proposals for a new mixed-use development comprising offices, retail units, leisure facilities and a boutique hotel on the site of the former O'Connell Street store.

Some 460 workers lost their jobs when Clerys closed, receiving only statutory redundancy, leading to a wave of criticism against investor Deirdre Foley, the D2 Private chief and director of Natrium who unsuccessfully challenged the powers of inspectors investigating collective redundancies at Clerys.

More than 40 "objector letters" were filed to the council which has attached 28 conditions to its approval for the redevelopment of the historic Clerys premises.

A peek at the proposed development for Clery's Building
A peek at the proposed development for Clery's Building

Ms Foley expressed her satisfaction at the decision.

"I'm delighted that Dublin City Council has given us this phenomenal opportunity to help in the regeneration and redevelopment of this iconic building and to be a major catalyst for bringing O'Connell Street back to its former glory and the historic centre of the city," Ms Foley said.

Natrium intends to create what it described as a "rooftop destination" area consisting of restaurants, bars and entertainment spaces with views of Dublin city and Dublin bay.

The company also aims to reinvigorate Earl Place into a new street populated by retail units and a pedestrian area for shoppers.

Natrium said in a statement it intended to work with Dublin City Council and others to ensure the Clerys redevelopment delivered "significant economic benefits for north inner-city Dublin", maximising local employment and apprenticeship opportunities in the process.

Irish Independent

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