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800 northside Dublin apartments get planning green light

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Residential: The new development on Carnlough Rd, Cabra will include a large crèche

Residential: The new development on Carnlough Rd, Cabra will include a large crèche

Residential: The new development on Carnlough Rd, Cabra will include a large crèche

MORE than 800 northside Dublin apartments in proposed developments containing crèches, gyms and cafés have received planning approval under fast-track housing rules.

In decisions published yesterday, An Bord Pleanála approved a 485-unit residential development on the Carnlough Road in Cabra, Dublin 7, on lands purchased from CIE in 2004.

It also gave the green light to Cosgrave Developments' 329-unit development on former Santry Demesne grounds off Northwood Avenue near the Gullivers Retail Park and M50. The Cosgrave plan envisions four eight-storey blocks, mostly two-bedroom units with penthouses on top,

An Bord Pleanála said the Santry development must have at least 62 child places in its crèche. It eliminated two proposed ground-floor apartments to increase space for day-care services.

In Cabra, the build-to-rent scheme by UK firm Tristan Capital Partners - which acquired the site last year from Pat Crean's Marlet Property Group for a reported €39m -includes nine blocks ranging from two to eight storeys in height.

The design includes a neighbourhood centre with a café, convenience store, gym and crèche. One block will be community space, including co-working areas, meeting rooms and a cinema.

Marlet previously received planning approval for a 420-unit development on the site, which runs parallel to the Phoenix Park rail line and is 1 kilometre from the Phibsborough Luas stop.

Tristan, a London property investment firm, is one of the State's largest residential landlords with sizeable assets on the south side of Dublin.

Its local arm, Seven Cabra Real Estate, applied for planning permission in November under the Government's Strategic Housing Development rules. These allow developers to bypass local authorities and seek approval directly from An Bord Pleanála.

Irish Independent