Tuesday 12 December 2017

Thousands of British job hunters looking across Irish Sea as exit reality sinks in

Analysis by Indeed shows that roles in Ireland attracting more interest among UK jobseekers include nurses, business development managers, social media specialists and sales consultants. Stock picture
Analysis by Indeed shows that roles in Ireland attracting more interest among UK jobseekers include nurses, business development managers, social media specialists and sales consultants. Stock picture

John Mulligan and Donal O'Donovan

Hundreds of thousands of UK-based workers are eyeing jobs abroad, including in Ireland, as they continue to fret about the impact of Brexit.

Global jobs site Indeed said that the number of searches made by UK-based people for jobs in Ireland remained 11pc higher in April this year than it was before last June's Brexit vote.

Job hunters in the United Kingdom are also on the lookout for a wider range of positions in Ireland than previously.

Analysis by Indeed shows that roles in Ireland attracting more interest among UK jobseekers include nurses, business development managers, social media specialists and sales consultants. Also increasing in popularity among those looking for a job in Ireland are positions such as data scientist, accountant, welder, and customer service manager.

"While European traffic to the UK has declined, Indeed is seeing that countries like Ireland, followed by France and Germany, could be benefiting from additional interest levels from European jobseekers," according to Mariano Mamertino, a senior economist at Indeed.

He added: "It is clear that the increase in people looking at jobs outside the UK post-Brexit has been more than just a short-term reaction and is continuing on a sustained basis.

"Over one year on, Ireland continues to be well-placed to benefit from these labour flows as the only English-speaking EU member, with the fastest economic growth rate and a flexible labour market."

But while the number of searches for jobs in Ireland may be increasing, the deluge of new roles the Government had hoped would be generated here as UK-based banks, insurers and other firms strengthen their footholds in EU countries to ensure continued access to the trading bloc after Brexit, has not materialised.

Yesterday it was reported by news agency Bloomberg that Japanese financial giant Nomura has selected Frankfurt as its EU headquarters after the UK leaves the union.

While it will involve fewer than 100 people, the decision is another blow for Ireland's chances at reaping a significant Brexit dividend.

A number of financial firms such as Lloyds and AIG have already plumped for locations such as Brussels, Paris and Luxembourg over Dublin.

Japanese investment bank Daiwa said yesterday that it would move staff from London to Frankfurt.

"Overall, we are seeing a sharper and longer decline in interest in working in the UK than in previous 'shock drops' following last year's referendum," said Mr Mamertino.

"As Brexit moves from rhetoric to reality, the strain on Britain's strong but tight labour market will worsen."

Irish Independent

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