Monday 19 August 2019

Jail threat as Port Company claims firm is failing to vacate site needed for Brexit fallout

 

Dublin Port Company (DPC) had previously brought proceedings aimed at securing possession of a site at Tolka Quay (stock photo)
Dublin Port Company (DPC) had previously brought proceedings aimed at securing possession of a site at Tolka Quay (stock photo)

Aodhan O'Faolain

Dublin Port Company claims a firm breached a court order by failing to vacate a site needed to deal with the affect of Brexit.

It is seeking orders from the High Court which could result in one of McQuaid O'Flanagan Warehousing and Transport's directors being sent to prison and the seizure of the company's property.

Dublin Port Company (DPC) had previously brought proceedings aimed at securing possession of a site at Tolka Quay.

The site is earmarked for truck parks and customs, immigration and agricultural inspection posts after Brexit.

The property had been mainly occupied by McQuaid O'Flanagan, which had a lease with the former owners.

DPC bought the site in January and said McQuaid O'Flanagan's lease expired last November.

The case returned before Mr Justice David Keane yesterday, when lawyers for DPC said McQuaid O'Flanagan was in contempt of the order made in March.

DPC is seeking an order appointing a receiver to sequester the property of both McQuaid O'Flanagan and of one of its directors, Gerald McQuaid. It also seeks an order for Mr McQuaid's attachment and possible committal to prison.

The judge, on an ex-parte basis, granted DPC permission to serve short notice of the proceedings on the defendants.

Irish Independent

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