Tuesday 16 July 2019

Corbyn does not want rerun of 2016 Brexit referendum

British Labour Party Leader, Jeremy Corbyn pictured with Patricia King, General Secretary, ICTU at the Parnell Sq ICTU HQ.
PIC COLIN O’RIORDAN
British Labour Party Leader, Jeremy Corbyn pictured with Patricia King, General Secretary, ICTU at the Parnell Sq ICTU HQ. PIC COLIN O’RIORDAN
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn. (PA/Stefan Rousseau)

Anne-Marie Walsh

BRITISH Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn has said a second referendum on Brexit should not be a rerun of the 2016 vote but a new withdrawal deal.

Speaking in Dublin this evening, he said he would support a public vote on a negotiated deal with the EU “or alternatives to that”.

Mr Corbyn said he was in town to meet “old friends” at the Irish Congress of Trade Unions Office to discuss workers’ rights.

He also plans to meet the Taoiseach tomorrow to discuss a customs union with the EU, and the “dynamic protection” of rights obtained through EU membership,

“The referendum would be on a negotiated deal or alternatives to that,” he said when asked about the possibility of a second referendum.

“It’s not a rerun of 2016. It would be on the basis of whatever we have succeeded in negotiating.

“The British government is imploding at the present time and we are very keen to ensure that there is a process that prevents a no deal exit from the European Union.

“Because I believe that would be incredibly damaging to industry all across Britain and with that, trade across Ireland as well.”

He said the Tory party leadership candidates that have nominated themselves so far seem to be of the view that there should be a no deal exit.

But he said his party’s position has always been that the border between the north and the Republic should be an open trading border.

“We’ve made that absolutely a basis of all our discussions and negotiations in parliament,” he said.

When asked how he would convince the EU to renegotiate, he said there would be a new commission following the recent elections and the important thing is to get agreement.

“I do not want Britain to become some sort of tax haven on the shores of Europe,” he added.

“I want us to have a close relationship with Europe in the future. After all, jobs on both sides of the channel and of course in Ireland as well depend on that trading relationship.”

When asked about the fact that Boris Johnson has been ordered to appear in court over claims he lied to the British public during the Brexit campaign, he said: “I try not to think about Boris Johnson too much.”

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