| 7.1°C Dublin

80pc agree with Ireland staying in EU

Close

A Red C poll found that 80pc of Irish citizens would vote to remain in the union, an increase of 2pc on 2015. Photo: REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

A Red C poll found that 80pc of Irish citizens would vote to remain in the union, an increase of 2pc on 2015. Photo: REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

A Red C poll found that 80pc of Irish citizens would vote to remain in the union, an increase of 2pc on 2015. Photo: REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

Ireland is among the least likely countries to vote to leave the European Union, new research suggests.

A Red C poll found that 80pc of Irish citizens would vote to remain in the union, an increase of 2pc on 2015.

It makes Ireland one of the most pro-EU countries on the continent, along with Spain.

The survey also shows that 62pc of Irish people believe the union is heading in the right direction.

Many other member states are also less likely to vote to leave than last year. In France, 32pc of people would support a 'leave' vote, falling from 35pc last year.

Meanwhile, 25pc of Germans said they would vote to exit the bloc compared to 28pc in 2015. However, support for leaving the EU has increased substantially in Finland, rising from 29pc last year to 40pc now.

Greece and the UK are the most in favour of rescinding their EU membership, with 46pc in both countries saying they would vote to leave. In the UK referendum, 52pc voted to leave.

Meanwhile, Irish tourism industry figures say Brexit and a lack of hotel beds in Dublin could prove challenging in 2017.

The Irish Tourist Industry Confederation (ITIC) welcomed this year's record number of 8.8 million international visitors.

ITIC also highlighted that tourism is now worth €8bn to the Irish economy, but warned against complacency ahead of the new year.

Business Newsletter

Read the leading stories from the world of business.

This field is required

Eoghan O'Mara Walsh, chief executive of the ITIC, welcomed the new highs for the industry but stressed that the impact of the Brexit vote could still pose problems.

A weakened sterling would be the most immediate challenge, he said.

"With Article 50 due to be triggered next March, we expect sterling to remain relatively weak," he told the Irish Independent.

"It makes holidays in Ireland seem more expensive for British visitors."

But he remained optimistic for 2017, pointing to a strong market for North American visitors.

"Brexit is the main challenge, but we are still predicting a 3pc to 5pc growth in visitor numbers next year."

Tourists from abroad spent €4.7bn in Ireland in 2016, a 9pc increase on 2015.

The domestic market was also strong, with revenue increasing to €1.75m and a further €300m coming from Northern Irish visitors.

But Mr O'Mara Walsh said 50 new hotels would be needed in Dublin alone.


Most Watched





Privacy