Sunday 25 June 2017

Sessions 'would recuse himself from Clinton probe'

Attorney General-designate Sen Jeff Sessions takes his seat before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Attorney General-designate Sen Jeff Sessions takes his seat before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Attorney General nominee Sen Jeff Sessions faces a grilling. (AP/Molly Riley)

Sen. Jeff Sessions has said that if he is confirmed as attorney general, he would recuse himself from investigations relating to Hillary Clinton's email server.

Mr Sessions was asked by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley how he would handle the Clinton probe.

The Alabama senator said because of some of the comments he made during the presidential election campaign, "the proper thing to do would be to recuse myself".

In further comments to the committee, Mr Sessions also said he does not support a ban on Muslims entering the United States.

President-election Donald Trump proposed a temporary ban on Muslim immigrants during the Republican primary campaign, drawing sharp criticism from both parties.

During the general election, he shifted his rhetoric to focus on temporarily halting immigration from an unspecified list of countries with ties to terrorism. But he did not disavow the Muslim ban, which is still prominently displayed on his campaign website.

Mr Sessions reiterated Mr Trump's position of stronger vetting of potential terrorists at his confirmation hearing, but he denounced a ban on Muslim.

"I do not support the idea that Muslims should be denied entry to the United States," he said.

He did, however, express support for keeping the Guantanamo Bay detention camp on Cuba open.

He said he believes it is a safe place to house suspected terrorists captured overseas and should continue to be used.

That perspective differs from the viewpoint of the Obama administration, which has transferred prisoners to other countries in hopes of ultimately closing the facility.

In the last eight years, the Justice Department has moved to bring militants captured abroad to American courts, rather than placing them in Guantanamo and treating them as military detainees.

Press Association

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in World News