Tuesday 23 December 2014

Rolls-Royce sorry for plane problem

Published 27/06/2013 | 08:32

An engine that failed on a Qantas A380 superjumbo is removed from the plane at Singapore Airport (AP/Australian Transport Safety Bureau)
An engine that failed on a Qantas A380 superjumbo is removed from the plane at Singapore Airport (AP/Australian Transport Safety Bureau)
Firefighters surround the Qantas passenger plane which made an emergency landing in 2010 (AP)
The Qantas passenger plane made an emergency landing with more than 400 people aboard (AP)

Rolls-Royce has admitted it had "clearly fallen short" of the highest standards following the dramatic disintegration of an engine on board the world's largest passenger plane.

A final report by Australian investigators into the November 2010 incident aboard a Qantas Airbus A380 superjumbo with 440 passengers aboard said the engine explosion was caused by a poorly built oil pipe that failed to conform to design specifications.

The explosion happened shortly after the superjumbo had taken off from Singapore bound for Sydney and led to debris falling on to Indonesia's Batam Island. The pilots managed to get the plane back to Singapore where it landed safely and no one was hurt.

The incident led to the temporary grounding of 20 superjumbos with Trent 900 engines.

Rolls-Royce engineering and technology director Colin Smith said: "This was a serious and rare event which we very much regret.

"At Rolls-Royce we continually strive to meet the high standards of safety, quality and reliability that our customers and their passengers are entitled to expect.

"On this occasion we clearly fell short. The robustness of the Airbus A380 and the professionalism of the Qantas crew members assured that the aircraft and all its passengers landed safely."

"We support the ATSB's (Australian Transport Safety Bureau) conclusions and, as the report notes, have already applied the lessons learned throughout our engineering, manufacturing and quality assurance procedures to prevent this type of event from happening again."

Press Association

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