Monday 5 December 2016

Police give prosecutors findings on Baltimore man's death

Scott Malone and Ian Simpson

Published 30/04/2015 | 18:51

Police and National Guard troops stand guard as demonstrators march in Baltimore Credit: Eric Thayer
Police and National Guard troops stand guard as demonstrators march in Baltimore Credit: Eric Thayer

Following widespread protests, Baltimore police have handed prosecutors the findings of an internal investigation into the death of Freddie Gray, a black man who suffered spinal injuries while in custody.

  • Go To

Police have said there were no plans to make the findings public, but the report was turned over to Baltimore City's chief prosecutor a day earlier than expected, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts told a news conference.

"I understand the frustration, I understand the sense of urgency," Batts said.

"That is why we have finished it a day ahead of time."

Read More: 'I want the white media out of Baltimore until you're here to report the real story'

Batts said the police investigation of the death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray on April 19 was not over.

"If new evidence is found, we will follow it," he said.

Prosecutors have said they would conduct their own investigation before deciding whether to charge six police officers involved in Gray's arrest on April 12.

Gray's death has become the latest flashpoint in a nationwide debate about police use of lethal force and race relations.

Read More: Watch: Senate leader criticises Fox News for 'inciting people' on live broadcast

Protests spread to other major cities on Wednesday for the first time since Gray died, a reprise of demonstrations that broke out last year after police killings of unarmed black men in Ferguson, Missouri, New York and elsewhere.

More than 100 people were arrested in New York overnight on Wednesday as protesters fanned out across Manhattan after a rally, briefly disrupting traffic in places.

The Baltimore police commissioner made the announcement about the report after a curfew held for a second night and relative calm returned to the predominantly African-American city.

Read More: Baltimore protesters accuse police of 'kidnapping' student campaigner Joseph Kent live on air

Looting, arson and street clashes with police rocked Baltimore on Monday after Gray's funeral.

On Thursday morning, thousands of National Guard troops and police remained in place. But the police presence was noticeably lighter than Wednesday.

On the street corner in West Baltimore where the worst of the rioting took place, only a dozen city police officers in normal patrol uniforms were on the street.

Read More: Troops patrolling streets as Baltimore convulsed by riots


Authorities say Gray was running from police and when caught, transported to a police station in a van with no seat restraint.

He suffered a spinal injury and died in the hospital.

A lawyer for Gray's family says his spine was 80 pc severed at the neck while in custody.

Read More: Baltimore riots: State of emergency declared as looters ransack stores and set fire to police cars after Freddie Gray's funeral

The officers involved in the arrest have been suspended, and the US Justice Department is investigating the incident for possible civil rights violations.

"We are confident that our state's attorney is going to do what needs to be done," said State Senator Catherine Pugh, who has been a frequent presence on Baltimore's streets the last two nights.

A protester carries a sign during a march trough Baltimore Credit: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds
A protester carries a sign during a march trough Baltimore Credit: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds
Police in riot gear line up Credit: David Goldman
Police in riot gear line up Credit: David Goldman
Protesters against police violence stop traffic at a major intersection Credit: Jonathan Ernst
Protesters against police violence stop traffic at a major intersection Credit: Jonathan Ernst

Online Editors

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in World News