Thursday 27 November 2014

Palatial style accommodation fit for a...doll

Published 03/06/2014 | 15:49

Undated handout photo issued by the Victoria and Albert Musuem of the Killer House which was a gift from surgeon John Egerton Killer to
his wife and daughters in the 1830s, the Chinese-style cabinet is
lavishly appointed with gilded wallpapers, four-poster bed and
liveried servants. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday June 3, 2014. Some of Britain's largest and most treasured dolls' houses are set to go on display in an exhibition which has been several years in the making. Dolls' houses spanning the last 300 years and designed in the style of country mansions, Georgian town houses, suburban villas, council housing and high-rise apartments will go on show at the V&A Museum Of Childhood. See PA story ARTS House. Photo credit should read: Victoria and Albert Museum/PA Wire

NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
The Killer House
The Killer House was a gift from surgeon John Egerton Killer to his wife and daughters in the 1830s
UDolls' houses spanning the last 300 years and designed in the style of country mansions, Georgian town houses, suburban villas, council housing and high-rise apartments will go on show at the V&A Museum Of Childhood
Kaleidoscope House
Some of Britain's largest and most treasured dolls' houses are set to go on display in an exhibition which has been several years in the making
Victoria and Albert Musuem of The Tate Baby House, dating from 1760, which was owned by five or six generations, passed down from mother to eldest daughter, and includes original wallpapers and painted paneling in the style of Robert Adam and a lying-in room for a pregnant doll

Some of Europe's largest and most treasured dolls' houses are set to go on display in an exhibition which has been several years in the making.

Dolls' houses spanning the last 300 years and designed in the style of country mansions, Georgian town houses, suburban villas, council housing and high-rise apartments will go on show at the V&A Museum Of Childhood.

Opening in December, the exhibition will feature about 1,900 objects, such as furniture and dolls, which have been restored over the last two years by the V&A conservation department.

The exhibition, which tracks developments in architecture and design, is set to tour the UK, Europe and the US after it finishes its run at the east London museum.

The oldest house in the exhibition dates from 1712, and the largest one is 160cm tall with many of the dolls' houses built for adults rather than children.

Highlights will include The Tate Baby House, which dates from 1760 and was passed down through five generations of a family and includes original wallpapers, painted panelling and a lying-in room for a pregnant doll.

Another, from the 1830s, features a Chinese-style cabinet with gilded wallpapers, a four-poster bed and liveried servants.

The Hopkinson House shows a Second World War-era family in a council house preparing for an air-raid, with gas masks, ration books and torches.

A modernist villa from the 1930s comes complete with chrome furniture, a cocktail bar, futurist artworks and a swimming pool, while another - the most contemporary, from 2001, includes a modern step-family.

Curator Alice Sage said: "Dolls' houses are uncanny things, full of strangely familiar objects and funny little characters. The experience of peeking into the tiny rooms and seeing all the meticulous detail is fascinating for children and adults, and hopefully everyone will discover something new.

"Our research for the exhibition uncovered new characters and stories in the histories of these objects, and now we are using them to bring the houses to life in a fun and imaginative way."

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