Thursday 29 June 2017

What happens next? Everything you need to know about Donald Trump's chaotic 'Muslim Ban'

Donald Trump in the White House with members of his team (AP/Alex Brandon)
Donald Trump in the White House with members of his team (AP/Alex Brandon)
In this Jan. 27, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
A man raises his fist during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
King County Councilmember Larry Gossett speaks during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
A woman cheers with a Somali flag during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
Demonstrators shut down the traffic loops at LAX International Airport and yell slogans during a protest against the travel ban imposed by U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order, at Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Ted Soqui
Young men cheer during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
Demonstrators shut down the traffic loops at LAX International Airport and yell slogans during a protest against the travel ban imposed by U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order, at Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Ted Soqui
A man holds a sign during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
Muslim Somali immigrants cheer during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, U.S. Washington January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
Hundreds of demonstrators gather on the roadway during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel to the United States by citizens of several countries at Los Angeles International Airport, Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)
People gather during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel to the United States by citizens of several countries Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, at Detroit Metropolitan Airport. (Jeffrey M. Smith/The Times Herald via AP)
People march through downtown Seattle during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban in Seattle, Washington January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
Demonstrators hold signs and chant during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel to the United States by citizens of several countries Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, at Detroit Metropolitan Airport. (Jeffrey M. Smith/The Times Herald via AP)
Activists gather at Portland International Airport to protest against President Donald Trump's executive action travel ban in Portland, Oregon, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Dipaola
Activists gather at Portland International Airport to protest against President Donald Trump's executive action travel ban in Portland, Oregon, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Dipaola
Activists gather at Portland International Airport to protest against President Donald Trump's executive action travel ban in Portland, Oregon, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

Denise Calnan, Alexander Cornwell and Steve Holland

What did Donald Trump get up to this weekend? The new US President has kept his election campaign promise and moved to ban entry of refugees and people from seven Muslim-majority countries into the US.

Aides to Trump call the implementation of a temporary travel ban on people from seven Muslim-majority countries a "massive success story" despite criticism from some top Republicans, protests and disarray at airports.

So, what does it all mean? Independent.ie has the full story explained here:

1. What is Donald Trump's 'Muslim Ban' executive order?

King County Councilmember Larry Gossett speaks during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
King County Councilmember Larry Gossett speaks during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder

An executive order is an official statement from the president which tells government agencies how to use their resources. 

This order bars citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the US for a period of 90 days. The order also suspends the United States' refugee system for 120 days. Essentially, on Friday, President Donald Trump on Friday suspended the entry of people from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

The order has led to the detention or deportation of hundreds of people arriving at U.S. airports.

2. What does this mean for refugees?

Young men cheer during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
Young men cheer during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder

Trump's ban has completely suspended the US Syrian refugee programme, which accepted a total of 12,486 Syrians last year. It also details that preference should be given to Christian refugees over Muslim refugees. Furthermore, the total number of refugees allowed to enter the US this year is now 50,000, down from 110,000.

3. What does it mean for dual nationals?

Demonstrators hold signs and chant during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel to the United States by citizens of several countries Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, at Detroit Metropolitan Airport. (Jeffrey M. Smith/The Times Herald via AP)
Demonstrators hold signs and chant during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel to the United States by citizens of several countries Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, at Detroit Metropolitan Airport. (Jeffrey M. Smith/The Times Herald via AP)

It is unclear if the ban applies to dual nationals - those who hold one passport from a country on the list and another from a non-U.S. country that is not.

Etihad said on its website that dual citizens could travel to the U.S. using their non-banned passport. The International Air Transport Association (IATA) have told its members that the ban does not apply to dual nationals if they have a passport not on the list, according to an email seen by Reuters.

People march through downtown Seattle during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban in Seattle, Washington January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
People march through downtown Seattle during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban in Seattle, Washington January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder

However, the Guardian reported on Saturday, quoting State Department officials, that dual nationals were banned.

On Sunday, IATA sent another email to member airlines, seen by Reuters, asking for examples of Green Card holders being denied boarding. It also said it was seeking more information from authorities in Washington.

4. Have any of the country's leaders reacted to Trump's order?

Saudi Arabia's King Salman, in a telephone call on Sunday with U.S. President Donald Trump, agreed to support safe zones in Syria and Yemen, a White House statement said.

Activists gather at Portland International Airport to protest against President Donald Trump's executive action travel ban in Portland, Oregon, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Dipaola
Activists gather at Portland International Airport to protest against President Donald Trump's executive action travel ban in Portland, Oregon, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

Trump, during his presidential campaign last year, had called for Gulf states to pay for establishing safe zones to protect Syrian refugees.

A senior Saudi source told Reuters the two leaders spoke for more than an hour by telephone and agreed to step up counter-terrorism and military cooperation and enhance economic cooperation.

However, the source had no word on whether the two leaders discussed Trump's order to put a four-month hold on allowing refugees into the United States and temporarily ban travelers from Syria and six other Muslim-majority countries. 

People chant slogans at the Indianapolis International Airport, Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order temporarily suspending all immigration for citizens of seven majority Muslim countries for 90 days. (Kelly Wilkinson/The Indianapolis Star via AP)
People chant slogans at the Indianapolis International Airport, Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order temporarily suspending all immigration for citizens of seven majority Muslim countries for 90 days. (Kelly Wilkinson/The Indianapolis Star via AP)
Demonstrators gather outside Tom Bradley International Terminal during a protest against President Donald Trump's travel ban on refugees and citizens of seven Muslim-majority nations, at Los Angeles International Airport on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)
Deanna Culley gets ready for a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order temporarily suspending all immigration for citizens of seven majority Muslim countries for 90 days at the Indianapolis International Airport, Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. (Kelly Wilkinson/The Indianapolis Star via AP)
Protesters wrap around the baggage carousels as they listen to speakers at the Indianapolis International Airport, Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order temporarily suspending all immigration for citizens of seven majority Muslim countries for 90 days. (Kelly Wilkinson/The Indianapolis Star via AP)
People chant slogans at the Indianapolis International Airport, Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order temporarily suspending all immigration for citizens of seven majority Muslim countries for 90 days. (Kelly Wilkinson/The Indianapolis Star via AP)
People chant slogans at the Indianapolis International Airport, Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. (Kelly Wilkinson/The Indianapolis Star via AP)
People during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
People walk toward Westlake Park for a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
A young Muslim woman listens during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
A man raises his fist during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
King County Councilmember Larry Gossett speaks during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
A woman cheers with a Somali flag during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
People march through downtown Seattle during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
Muslim Somali immigrants cheer during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, U.S. Washington January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
Young men cheer during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
Demonstrators shut down the traffic loops at LAX International Airport and yell slogans during a protest against the travel ban imposed by U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order, at Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Ted Soqui
Demonstrators shut down the traffic loops at LAX International Airport and yell slogans during a protest against the travel ban imposed by U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order, at Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Ted Soqui
Demonstrators shut down the traffic loops at LAX International Airport and yell slogans during a protest against the travel ban imposed by U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order, at Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Ted Soqui
A man holds a sign during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban, in Seattle, Washington, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
People march through downtown Seattle during a protest held in response to President Donald Trump's travel ban in Seattle, Washington January 29, 2017. REUTERS/David Ryder
People gather during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel to the United States by citizens of several countries Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, at Detroit Metropolitan Airport. (Jeffrey M. Smith/The Times Herald via AP)
Demonstrators hold signs and chant during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel to the United States by citizens of several countries Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, at Detroit Metropolitan Airport. (Jeffrey M. Smith/The Times Herald via AP)
Hundreds of demonstrators gather on the roadway during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel to the United States by citizens of several countries at Los Angeles International Airport, Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Ryan Kang)
Demonstrators hold signs and chant in the baggage claim area during a protest against President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel to the United States by citizens of several countries Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, at Detroit Metropolitan Airport. (Jeffrey M. Smith/The Times Herald via AP)

5. Have other country leaders reacted?

The short answer is 'yes'. Canada will offer temporary residency to any travelers stranded by Trump's orders temporarily barring people from seven Muslim-majority countries, a senior official says.

Britain's Foreign Office says Donald Trump's travel restrictions only apply to individuals traveling from the seven named countries, so people arriving from other countries, including the United Kingdom, would not be subject to more checks regardless of nationality or place of birth.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel tells Trump that the global fight against terrorism is no excuse for banning refugees or people from Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States, her spokesman says.

Prime Minister Theresa May says Britain does not agree with Trump's curbs on immigration after coming under criticism from lawmakers in her own party for not condemning his executive order when initially questioned.

Trump's temporary ban on Yemeni citizens traveling to the United States is "illegal and illegitimate," authorities controlled by the Iran-allied Houthi group in Yemen's capital say.

6. Have people reacted?

Yes. Tens of thousands of people rallied in U.S. cities and at airports on Sunday to voice outrage over President Donald Trump's executive order restricting entry into the country for travelers from seven Muslim-majority nations.

In New York, Washington and Boston, a second wave of demonstrations followed spontaneous rallies that broke out at U.S. airports on Saturday as U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents began enforcing Trump's directive.

The protests spread westward as the day progressed.

The order, which bars admission of Syrian refugees and suspends travel to the United States from Syria, Iraq, Iran and four other countries on national security grounds.

7. What are Trump's supporters saying?

Many of President Donald Trump's core political supporters had a simple message on Sunday for the fiercest opponents of his immigration ban: Calm down.

The relaxed reaction among the kind of voters who drove Trump's historic upset victory - working- and middle-class residents of Midwest and the South - provided a striking contrast to the uproar that has gripped major coastal cities, where thousands of protesters flocked to airports where immigrants had been detained.

In the St. Louis suburb of Manchester, Missouri, 72-year-old Jo Ann Tieken characterized the president as bringing reason into an overheated debate.

"Somebody has to stand up, be the grown up and see what we can do better to check on people coming in," she said. "I'm all for everybody to stop and take a breath. Just give it a chance."

8. What does it mean for air travel?

The decision caught airlines off guard, according to the International Air Transport Association .

"I cannot think of anything comparable. This brings a mix of administrative confusion, impact and uncertainty for many travellers as well as practical operational headaches and complexities for airlines in planning their flight programmes," independent aviation consultant John Strickland told Reuters.

The ban applies to pilots and flight attendants from the seven countries, even though all flight crew who are not U.S. citizens already need a special visa to enter the country.

Nicoley Baublies, from the German cabin crew union UFO, said the move was very unusual and meant uncertainty for airlines in terms of planning.

"Lufthansa has always ensured it has very diverse crews, with staff of different nationalities and that means that we are for the first time in decades having to look at where people come from," he told Reuters at Frankfurt airport.

9. How has it affected air travel so far?

The true extent of disruption to air travel is yet to be known but this weekend, Emirates airline was forced to chang pilot and flight attendant rosters on flights to the United States following the sudden U.S. travel ban on seven Muslim-majority countries, highlighting the challenges facing airlines trying to deal with the new rules.

The world's largest long-haul carrier, which flies daily to 11 U.S. cities, has made "the necessary adjustments to our crewing, to comply with the latest requirements," an Emirates spokeswoman told Reuters by email on Sunday. She added U.S. flights continue to operate to schedule.

Meanwhile, a "handful of people" have been stopped from flying to the United States from Dubai International Airport following a U.S. travel ban on seven Muslim-majority countries, the airport operator's chief executive said on Monday.

10. Has it affected the dollar?

The dollar fell on Monday, nudged off a one-week high against a basket of currencies after Treasury yields declined on data showing the U.S. economy growing more slowly than expected.

Underlying concerns over U.S. President's Donald Trump's protectionist trade stance also cut short the dollar's stay at the one-week peak, with a temporary travel ban on people from seven Muslim-majority countries imposed at the weekend adding another layer of uncertainty.

The dollar was down 0.6 percent at 114.410 yen after it rise on Friday to 115.380, its highest since Jan. 20.

The euro added to Friday's modest gains and was last 0.3 percent higher at $1.0733.

"The weak U.S. GDP is doing the dollar no favours. But it also takes courage to keep buying the dollar considering what Trump has said about the kind of a currency policy he could pursue," said Daisuke Karakama, market economist at Mizuho Bank in Tokyo.

11. Is this legally binding?

Executive orders are legally binding and are recorded in the Federal Register, a record of all regulations and public notices. These can be subjected to a legal review. In fact, according to the New York Times this weekend, the 'Muslim Ban' is illegal. They reported that the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 banned all discrimination against immigrants on the basis of national origin.

Opponents to the ban are now preparing legal challenges.

12. Anything else?

Donald Trump is now annoyed that the executive order is being referred to as a 'Muslim Ban'. In a statement released on Sunday, he wrote; "To be clear, this is not a Muslim ban, as the media is falsely reporting. This is not about religion — this is about terror and keeping our country safe."

Additional reporting: Reuters

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