Friday 22 September 2017

'We can whimper, whine, or we can fight back' - Hundreds of thousands march worldwide to protest Donald Trump's presidency

Women's Protest takes place across the globe

A protester takes part in the Women's March on London, as they walk from the American Embassy to Trafalgar Square, in central London, Britain January 21, 2017. The march formed part of a worldwide day of action following the election of Donald Trump to U.S. President. REUTERS/Neil Hall
A protester takes part in the Women's March on London, as they walk from the American Embassy to Trafalgar Square, in central London, Britain January 21, 2017. The march formed part of a worldwide day of action following the election of Donald Trump to U.S. President. REUTERS/Neil Hall
Thousands file through the streets during the Women's March in Sydney, Australia, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. Protesters at the Women's March rally carried placards with slogans including "Women of the world resist," ''Feminism is my trump card" and "Fight like a girl." (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)
People protest in solidarity with the Women's March in Washington at the same time as the U.S. Presidential inauguration, in Brussels on Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. The event organized by a multicultural grassroots coalition of women in the Brussels area seek to counter the rise of the far right agenda Äì be it in Europe, the U.S. or beyond. (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)
Protesters in London during a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Gareth Fuller/PA Wire
Protesters carry placards in London, during a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result.Gareth Fuller/PA Wire
Protesters carry placards in London, during a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Gareth Fuller/PA Wire
Satirical artist Kaya Mar holds one of his paintings during a march in London to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. John Stillwell/PA Wire
Protesters listen to speeches in Trafalgar Square, London, after taking part in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Photo credit should read: John Stillwell/PA Wire
Protesters listen to speeches in Trafalgar Square, London, after taking part in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. John Stillwell/PA Wire
Sandi Toksvig speaks at a rally in Trafalgar Square, London, after a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Gareth Fuller/PA Wire
Protesters walks with torchlight in the Women's March in Oslo, Norway, January 21, 2017. The march is being held in solidarity with similar events taking place internationaly. NTB Scanpix/Stian Lysberg Solum via REUTERS
Protesters carrying banners take part in the Women's March on London, as they walk from the American Embassy to Trafalgar Square, in central London, Britain January 21, 2017. The march formed part of a worldwide day of action following the election of Donald Trump to U.S. President. REUTERS/Neil Hall
Protesters take part in the Women's March in Paris, France, January 21, 2017. The march formed part of a worldwide day of action following the inauguration of Donald Trump to U.S. President. REUTERS/Jacky Naegelen
Protesters in London during a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Gareth Fuller/PA Wire
People gather for the Women's March in Washington U.S., January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Protesters gather for the Women's March in Oslo, Norway, January 21, 2017. The march is being held in solidarity with similar events taking place internationaly. NTB Scanpix/Stian Lysberg Solum via REUTERS
Protesters display their body graffiti as they take part in the Women's March on London, as they stand in Trafalgar Square, in central London, Britain January 21, 2017. The march formed part of a worldwide day of action following the election of Donald Trump to U.S. President. REUTERS/Neil Hall
Protesters carrying banners take part in the Women's March on London, as they stand in Trafalgar Square, in central London, Britain January 21, 2017. The march formed part of a worldwide day of action following the election of Donald Trump to U.S. President. REUTERS/Neil Hall
People gather for the Women's March in Washington U.S., January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Nicole Monceaux from New York City, attends the Women's March on Washington on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017 in Washington, on the first full day of Donald Trump's presidency. Thousands are massing on the National Mall for the Women's March, and they're gathering, too, in spots around the world. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
Demonstrators take part in the Women's March to protest Donald Trump's inauguration as the 45th president of the United States in Washington, January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
People pack the National Mall for the start of the Women's March in Washington, U.S. January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
People gather for the Women's March in Washington U.S., January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry walks to join the Women's March on Washington, after the inauguration of U.S. President Donald Trump, in Washington, DC, U.S. January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Protesters carry placards in Bristol in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Ben Birchall/PA Wire
Protesters carry placards in Bristol in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Ben Birchall/PA Wire
Protesters carry placards in Bristol in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Ben Birchall/PA Wire
A placard saying 'we shall overcomb' in Bristol in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result.Ben Birchall/PA Wire
Protesters carry placards in Bristol in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Ben Birchall/PA Wire
A young girl on the shoulders of a woman in Bristol in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Ben Birchall/PA Wire
Protesters carry placards in Bristol in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Ben Birchall/PA Wire
Protesters carry placards in Bristol in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Ben Birchall/PA Wire
Protesters carry placards in Bristol in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Ben Birchall/PA Wire
Protesters carry placards in Bristol in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Ben Birchall/PA Wire
Protesters carry placards in Bristol in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. Ben Birchall/PA Wire
Protesters carry placards in Bristol in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result.Ben Birchall/PA Wire
Chris Robshaw and partner Camilla Kerslake outside the American Embassy in London in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: SaturdayJohn Stillwell/PA Wire
Women hold signs to show solidarity with the Women's March in Washington and many other marches in several countries, in Zagreb, Croatia, January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Antonio Bronic
Protesters outside the American Embassy in London in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. John Stillwell/PA Wire
Kim Gregory protesting outside the American Embassy in London in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. John Stillwell/PA Wire
Protesters outside the American Embassy in London in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. John Stillwell/PA Wire
Protesters outside the American Embassy in London in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. John Stillwell/PA Wire
A protester outside the American Embassy in London in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. John Stillwell/PA Wire
People gather in front of the U.S. Embassy on Pariser Platz beside Brandenburg Gate in solidarity with women's march in Washington and many other marches in several countries, in Berlin, Germany, January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
People gather in front of the U.S. Embassy on Pariser Platz beside Brandenburg Gate in solidarity with women's march in Washington and many other marches in several countries, in Berlin, Germany, January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
People gather in front of the U.S. Embassy on Pariser Platz beside Brandenburg Gate in solidarity with women's march in Washington and many other marches in several countries, in Berlin, Germany, January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
Protesters carry placards in Bristol in a march to promote women's rights in the wake of the US election result. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Saturday Ben Birchall/PA Wire
People gather in front of the U.S. Embassy on Pariser Platz beside Brandenburg Gate in solidarity with women's march in Washington and many other marches in several countries, in Berlin, Germany, January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
People gather in front of the U.S. Embassy on Pariser Platz beside Brandenburg Gate in solidarity with women's march in Washington and many other marches in several countries, in Berlin, Germany, January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
Thousands file through the streets during the Women's March in Sydney, Australia, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)
Participants of a rally regarding women's rights hold placards as they march in Wellington, New Zealand, January 21, 2017 the day after Donald Trump's inauguration as President of the United States. Joshua Gimblett/Handout via REUTERS NO ARCHIVE.
A woman wearing a pink protest hat, symbol of the anti-Trump women's march, holds a sign that reads "Black Muslim lives matter" during an anti U.S. President Donald Trump protest outside the U.S. embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina, January 20, 2017. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci
People hold candles as they protest in solidarity with the Women's March in Washington at the same time as the U.S. Presidential inauguration, in Brussels on Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)
Micaela Johnson, of Leewood, Kan., in town to take part in Saturday's Women's March on Washington, takes a selfie with the Capitol Building in the background as preparations continue for Friday's presidential inauguration, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Diana Angus of the north side of Columbus holds a sign she made at home before the start of the Women's March on Washington - Ohio Sister March in Columbus, Ohio on Sunday, Jan. 15, 2017. (Brooke LaValley/The Columbus Dispatch via AP)

Emily Stephenson, Scott Malone and Bairbre Ní Bhraonain

Women all over the globe took to the streets to protest the inauguration of President Donald Trump today.

In the US capital, and recent scene of Trump’s triumph, women took the city back promising never to back down in the face of misogyny.  Democratic politician and academic Elizabeth Warren addressed a crowd in Washington by saying: “We can whimper, whine, or we can fight back.”

From the world of entertainment, actress America Ferrera used her profile to tell the Washington crowd: "We march today for the moral core of this nation, against which our new president is waging a war.

"Our dignity, our character, our rights have all been under attack and a platform of hate and division assumed power yesterday.

Micaela Johnson, of Leewood, Kan., in town to take part in Saturday's Women's March on Washington, takes a selfie with the Capitol Building in the background as preparations continue for Friday's presidential inauguration, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Micaela Johnson, of Leewood, Kan., in town to take part in Saturday's Women's March on Washington, takes a selfie with the Capitol Building in the background as preparations continue for Friday's presidential inauguration, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

"But the president is not America. We are America, and we are here to stay."

The women’s march boasted many well-known celebrities, from Scarlett Johansson, to Ashley Judd and Michael Moore are all lined up to take part in the speeches in Washington.

Diana Angus of the north side of Columbus holds a sign she made at home before the start of the Women's March on Washington - Ohio Sister March in Columbus, Ohio on Sunday, Jan. 15, 2017. (Brooke LaValley/The Columbus Dispatch via AP)
Diana Angus of the north side of Columbus holds a sign she made at home before the start of the Women's March on Washington - Ohio Sister March in Columbus, Ohio on Sunday, Jan. 15, 2017. (Brooke LaValley/The Columbus Dispatch via AP)

Performances from Mary Chapin Carpenter and Janelle Monae, among others are to be attended by a star-studded audience comprising Cher, Katy Perry and Julianne Moore.

According to City officials attendance at the Women's March on Washington had doubled expectations with estimates reaching well into 500,000.

A woman wearing a pink protest hat, symbol of the anti-Trump women's march, holds a sign that reads
A woman wearing a pink protest hat, symbol of the anti-Trump women's march, holds a sign that reads "Black Muslim lives matter" during an anti U.S. President Donald Trump protest outside the U.S. embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina, January 20, 2017. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci

During the march, placards emblazoned with slogans like "Women won't back down" and "Less fear more love" must have given the new president pause.  Yet the normally twitter-happy Trump was strangely silent during the massive demo.

Someone who did tweet her approval of the march was Trump’s defeated Republican rival Hillary Clinton who resurrected her campaign slogan “We’re always Stronger Together.”

Participants of a rally regarding women's rights hold placards as they march in Wellington, New Zealand, January 21, 2017 the day after Donald Trump's inauguration as President of the United States. Joshua Gimblett/Handout via REUTERS NO ARCHIVE.
Participants of a rally regarding women's rights hold placards as they march in Wellington, New Zealand, January 21, 2017 the day after Donald Trump's inauguration as President of the United States. Joshua Gimblett/Handout via REUTERS NO ARCHIVE.

She thanked attendees on Twitter for "standing, speaking and marching for our values". She said this is as "important as ever".

Across the world, from Dublin and Sydney to Copenhagen, women and all feminist supporters were demonstrating.

People gather in front of the U.S. Embassy on Pariser Platz beside Brandenburg Gate in solidarity with women's march in Washington and many other marches in several countries, in Berlin, Germany, January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
People gather in front of the U.S. Embassy on Pariser Platz beside Brandenburg Gate in solidarity with women's march in Washington and many other marches in several countries, in Berlin, Germany, January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke

Copenhagen march organiser Lesley-Ann Brown said: "Nationalist, racist and misogynistic trends are growing worldwide and threaten the most marginalised groups in our societies, including women, people of colour, immigrants, Muslims, the LGBT community and people with disabilities."

Other groups who felt targeted by Trump’s biases joined the marches championing causes from climate change, gun control, immigrant rights to abortion rights.

People gather in front of the U.S. Embassy on Pariser Platz beside Brandenburg Gate in solidarity with women's march in Washington and many other marches in several countries, in Berlin, Germany, January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke
People gather in front of the U.S. Embassy on Pariser Platz beside Brandenburg Gate in solidarity with women's march in Washington and many other marches in several countries, in Berlin, Germany, January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke

Fashionable accessories on the marches were hand-knitted "pussyhats" – signalling female empowerment.

Though Trump’s name was never mentioned by march organisers and the emphasis was squarely put on loftier subjects such as human and women’s rights, the 45th president was never more conspicuous by his absence worldwide.

Reuters

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