Sunday 4 December 2016

Warnings of terror plot on election day crank up tensions

Ruth Sherlock and Rachael Alexander in Washington

Published 05/11/2016 | 02:30

A Donald Trump supporter disrupts remarks by US President Barack Obama at a Hillary for America campaign event at the Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Photo: Reuters
A Donald Trump supporter disrupts remarks by US President Barack Obama at a Hillary for America campaign event at the Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Photo: Reuters
Protest signs urging more civility in American politics flank a long row of signs supporting Republican President candidate Donald Trump in Hillsborough, North Carolina. Photo: Reuters
A man that went by the name "Pocket", a member of the Patriots Guard Riders (PGR), poses outside a rally for US Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump in Toledo, Ohio. Photo: Reuters
U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Wilmington, Ohio. Photo: Reuters
U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Wilmington, Ohio. Photo: Reuters
A child watches as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Wilmington, Ohio. Photo: Reuters
President Barack Obama greets supporters following his speech while campaigning for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Photo: AP
US Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign rally in Detroit, Michigan. Photo: Reuters
A supporter holds a sign aloft as she waits for U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to arrive at a campaign rally in Detroit, Michigan. Photo: Reuters
US Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign rally in Detroit, Michigan. Photo: Reuters
US Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton visits Miller's Bar in Dearborn, Michigan. Photo: Reuters

American authorities are on high alert following reports that al Qaida may be planning to launch attacks on US soil on the day of the presidential election.

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Law enforcement agencies in the states of New York, Texas and Virginia are bolstering their security presence after intelligence warned them that they may be targets for attacks.

"The public should expect to continue to observe an increased law enforcement and security presence across communities in public places," an American intelligence source said.

Intelligence agencies have not been able to confirm the credibility of the reports of plots.

Millions of Americans are expected at polling stations around the country on Tuesday to vote in one of the most divisive presidential elections in living memory.

Last month, the US carried out strikes in Afghanistan targeting two of al Qaida's senior leaders in the country.

The revelations came as the Democrats escalated their call for the FBI to reveal information regarding the ties between Donald Trump and Russia.

Harry Reid, the Democratic senator, claimed in a letter that James Comey, the FBI director, was holding back "explosive information" about ties between the Kremlin and the Republican nominee.

Mess

Trump, meanwhile, was continuing to give it to Hillary Clinton with both barrels. Yesterday he summed it all up to an Atkinson, New Hampshire, audience by saying: "What a mess". He added: "And all she had to do is follow the rules."

Trump was referring to controversies surrounding Clinton's use of a private email system while secretary of state and the work of the Clinton family foundation.

Mr Trump once more chose to speculate, without evidence, that a Clinton presidency would be marred by investigations and trials, creating "an unprecedented constitutional crisis".

The FBI recommended against charging anyone in connection with the email set-up this summer.

Mr Trump also accused the Department of Justice of doing everything it can "to protect their angel".

Trump's legion of followers is growing confident of his victory in the presidential race - and many say they would refuse to accept his defeat.

They are reinforced by tightening poll numbers and renewed scrutiny of Clinton's emails just days before election day. Nancy Fraize of New Hampshire said, "we're going to win" and if Trump doesn't that "we'll all be at the White House sitting on the front lawn. In arms".

In more than two dozen interviews conducted in battleground states in recent days, Trump supporters are nearly uniformly confident about their candidate's chances. Many say they feel he has momentum after the FBI's decision to review emails that may be related to Clinton's private server.

For her part, Mrs Clinton was busy accentuating the positive.

She was intent on celebrating a new jobs report that shows US employers added 161,000 jobs to the workforce last month.

She told voters at a rally in Pittsburgh that the new report marks 73 straight months of job growth.

She said she believes the "economy is poised to really take off and thrive".

She said: "When the middle class thrives, America thrives."

Mrs Clinton also said that Mr Trump would create an economy that would benefit the richest Americans, including his own family.

With early voting almost complete, her campaign is focusing on battlegrounds like Pennsylvania, Michigan and New Hampshire in the final days of the race.

The FBI and US intelligence agencies are examining faked documents aimed at discrediting the Clinton campaign as part of a broader investigation into what US officials believe has been an attempt by Russia to disrupt the presidential election, people with knowledge of the matter said. (© Daily Telegraph London)

Telegraph.co.uk

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