Thursday 8 December 2016

Trump plans to deport three million illegal immigrants

Meanwhile, President-elect softens vow to build Mexican wall

John Whitesides

Published 14/11/2016 | 02:30

Campaign manager Kellyanne Conway arrives at Trump Tower in New York to meet with her boss (REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz)
Campaign manager Kellyanne Conway arrives at Trump Tower in New York to meet with her boss (REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz)

President-elect Donald Trump backed away from his promise to build a wall on the US-Mexican border, saying some areas could instead be "fencing".

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But he insisted he would deport up to three million illegal immigrants who have criminal records.

Trump, who made his pledge to force Mexico to pay for a border wall a centrepiece of his White House campaign, said "for certain areas" he would accept fencing instead of a brick-and-mortar wall, according to excerpts released yesterday of his interview with the CBS program '60 Minutes'.

"But certain areas, a wall is more appropriate. I'm very good at this, it's called construction, there could be some fencing," the New York real estate developer said.

Mr Trump, who defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in Tuesday's election and replaces Democratic President Barack Obama on January 20, also said once he takes office he would remove immigrants in the country illegally with criminal records.

"What we are going to do is get the people that are criminal and have criminal records, gang members, drug dealers, where a lot of these people, probably two million, it could be even three million, we are getting them out of our country or we are going to incarcerate. But we're getting them out of our country," he said.

During the campaign, Mr Trump said he would deport the estimated 11 million immigrants in the country illegally, most of whom are Hispanic. In calling for the construction of a border wall, Mr Trump said Mexico was sending criminals and rapists into the United States.

Mr Trump and his senior advisers have signalled they could be flexible on some of his campaign promises.

Republican House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan, who will play a key role in getting Mr Trump's agenda through the Republican-led Congress, backed away from Mr Trump's promise of a "deportation force" to round up and deport immigrants in the country illegally.

"We are not planning on erecting a deportation force. Donald Trump's not planning on that," Mr Ryan told CNN's 'State of the Union' programme.

(L-R) Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) shows Melania Trump, U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, and Vice-President Mike Pence the Mall from the Speaker's Balcony on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
(L-R) Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) shows Melania Trump, U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, and Vice-President Mike Pence the Mall from the Speaker's Balcony on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) (L) shows Melania Trump (R) and U.S. President-elect Donald Trump (C) the Mall from the Speaker's Balcony on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
(L-R) Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) shows Melania Trump and U.S. President-elect Donald Trump the Mall from the Speaker's Balcony on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Congressional pages react after U.S. President-elect Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walked past them to meet at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) (L) shows Melania Trump and U.S. President-elect Donald Trump the Mall from the Speaker's Balcony on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President-elect Trump (2nd R), his wife Melania Trump (R), Vice President-elect Mike Pence (4th R) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) (3rd R) walk together to meet in McConnell's office at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Vice President-elect Mike Pence (2nd L) smiles as he and President-elect Trump (2nd R) walk with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) (R) to McConnell's office at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
President-elect Donald Trump, his wife Melania Trumpwalk to a meeting with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell at the U.S. Capitol for a meeting November 10, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
US President-elect Donald Trump (C) walks with his wife Melania Trump, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) on Capitol Hill in Washington,DC on November 10, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMMNICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
US President-elect Donald Trump (2nd R) walks with his wife Melania Trump, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) on Capitol Hill in Washington,DC on November 10, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMMNICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
US President-elect Donald Trump walks onto a balcony at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on November 10, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMMNICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
(From L to R) Melania Trump, US President-elect Donald Trump, House Speaker Paul Ryan and Vice President-elect Mike Pence meet at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on November 10, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMMNICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
US President-elect Donald Trump (2nd R) walks with his wife Melania Trump, Vice President-elect Mike Pence (L) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) on Capitol Hill in Washington,DC on November 10, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / YURI GRIPASYURI GRIPAS/AFP/Getty Images
US President-elect Donald Trump (C) walks with his wife Melania Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) on Capitol Hill in Washington,DC on November 10, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / YURI GRIPASYURI GRIPAS/AFP/Getty Images
Melania Trump listens to her husband US President-elect Donald Trump speak to the press at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on November 10, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMMNICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (L), walks with President-elect Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol for a meeting November 10, 2016 in Washington, DC. Earlier in the day president-elect Trump met with U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (2L), walks with President-elect Donald Trump, his wife Melania Trump, and Vice President-elect Mike Pence (L), at the U.S. Capitol for a meeting November 10, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (2L), walks with President-elect Donald Trump, his wife Melania Trump, and Vice President-elect Mike Pence (L), at the U.S. Capitol for a meeting November 10, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
US President-elect Donald Trump (C) walk with Vice President-elect Pence (L) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell(R) R-KY on Capitol Hill in Washington,DC on November 10, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / YURI GRIPASYURI GRIPAS/AFP/Getty Images
US President-elect Donald Trump (C) walks with his wife Melania Trump and Vice President-Elect Pence (2nd L) before a meeting with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell(L) R-KY on Capitol Hill in Washington,DC on November 10, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / YURI GRIPASYURI GRIPAS/AFP/Getty Images
President Barack Obama and President-elect Donald Trump shake hands following their meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
President Barack Obama listens to President-elect Donald Trump speak to members of the media during their meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
U.S. President Barack Obama (R) meets with President-elect Donald Trump to discuss transition plans in the White House Oval Office in Washington, U.S., November 10, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque - TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
President Barack Obama meets with President-elect Donald Trump in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
Journalists gather on the driveway in front of the West Wing in anticipation of the arrival of President-Elect Donald Trump at the White House. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

"I think we should put people's minds at ease.

"That is not what our focus is. That is not what we're focused on. We're focused on securing the border."

Kevin McCarthy, the No.2 House Republican, said on 'Fox News Sunday' the wall with Mexico could in parts be a "virtual" wall patrolled by drones.

"You have to put a wall, it could be all virtual with the UAV airplanes as well, but I think that is doable and one of the first things that needs to be done," McCarthy said, referring to unmanned aerial vehicles.

A supporter of the far-right English Defence League group is restrained by police after shouting his views, and disrupting an anti-racism protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump winning the American election, outside the U.S. embassy in London, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
A supporter of the far-right English Defence League group is restrained by police after shouting his views, and disrupting an anti-racism protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump winning the American election, outside the U.S. embassy in London, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
People protest on the University of Connecticut campus against the election of Republican Donald Trump as President Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, in Storrs, Conn. (AP Photo/Pat Eaton-Robb)
Protesters walk in the middle of traffic lanes after Donald Trump's election victory, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016 in downtown, Portland, Ore. Portland police made no arrests during Tuesday night's post-election protest. (Stephanie Yao Long//The Oregonian via AP)
Protesters walk in the middle of traffic lanes after Donald Trump's election victory, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016 in downtown, Portland, Ore. Portland police made no arrests during Tuesday night's post-election protest. (Stephanie Yao Long//The Oregonian via AP)
Berkeley High School students assemble on the UC Berkeley campus in protest to the election of Republican Donald Trump as President of the United States in Berkeley, California, U.S. November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage TEMPLATE OUT
A young man wearing a Berkeley High Class of 2016 shirt wipes away ters during a protest in response to the election of Republican Donald Trump as President of the United States in Berkeley, California, U.S. November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage
Berkeley High School students begin to march after assembling in front of Sproul Hall on the UC Berkeley campus in protest to the election of Republican Donald Trump as President of the United States in Berkeley, California, U.S. November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage
Alice Bynum (C) stands with other Berkeley High School staff members and holds a sign while attending a protest about the election of Republican Donald Trump as President of the United States in Berkeley, California, U.S. November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage
Two young women hold up a sign reading "nasty women unite" in protest to the election of Republican Donald Trump as President of the United States in Berkeley, California, U.S. November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage
Placards lay on the floor during an anti-racism protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump outside of the U.S. Embassy in London, Britain, November 9, 2016. Picture rotated 180 degrees. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
People hold placards at an anti-racism protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump outside of the U.S. Embassy in London, Britain, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
People hold placards at an anti-racism protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump outside of the U.S. Embassy in London, Britain, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
A supporter of the far-right English Defence League group is restrained by police during a protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump outside of the U.S. Embassy in London, Britain, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
A supporter of the far-right English Defence League group expresses his views to media during a protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump outside of the U.S. Embassy in London, Britain, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
People hold placards at an anti-racism protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump outside of the U.S. Embassy in London, Britain, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
People hold placards at an anti-racism protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump outside of the U.S. Embassy in London, Britain, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
A woman holds a placard at an anti-racism protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump outside of the U.S. Embassy in London, Britain, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Demonstrators protest against the election of U.S. president-elect Donald Trump in front of the White House in Washington November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
People hold placards at an anti-racism protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump outside of the U.S. Embassy in London, Britain, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
A man holds a placard at an anti-racism protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump outside of the U.S. Embassy in London, Britain, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Hannah McKay FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES
A woman holds a placard at an anti-racism protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump outside of the U.S. Embassy in London, Britain, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
A man holds placards at an anti-racism protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump outside of the U.S Embassy in London, Britain, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
University of California, Davis students protest on campus in Davis, California, U.S. following the election of Donald Trump as President of the United States November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Max Whittaker/File Photo
A protester faces a police line in downtown Oakland, Calif., early Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. President-elect Donald TrumpÄôs victory set off multiple protests. (Jane Tyska/Bay Area News Group via AP)
Police officers walk past an overturned newspaper rack during protests in Oakland, Calif., late Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. President-elect Donald TrumpÄôs victory set off multiple protests. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group via AP)
Madeline Lopes, left, and Cassidy Irwin, both of Oakland, march with other protesters in downtown Oakland, Calif., early Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. President-elect Donald TrumpÄôs victory set off multiple protests. (Jane Tyska/Bay Area News Group via AP)
An Oakland police officer checks out damage after a window was broken by protesters at a car dealership in downtown Oakland, Calif., on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016. President-elect Donald TrumpÄôs victory set off multiple protests. (Jane Tyska/Bay Area News Group via AP)
A trash fire burns during protests in Oakland, Calif., late Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. President-elect Donald TrumpÄôs victory set off multiple protests. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group via AP)
A woman yells as she takes part in a protest against President-elect Donald Trump, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
University of California, Davis students protest on campus in Davis, California, U.S. following the election of Donald Trump as President of the United States November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Max Whittaker

Mr Trump, who pledged to "drain the swamp" of corrupt insiders in the US capital, is considering a wide range of experienced Washington hands for his administration, as well as some officials with extensive lobbying experience.

Yesterday, senior adviser Kellyanne Conway indicated Mr Trump would be results-oriented as he chooses his top aides, prepares his transition to the White House and gets ready to work with Congress.

"He'll be surrounded by people who want to get things done. Because he's a transactional guy. He's a businessman," Ms Conway said on NBC's 'Meet the Press'. "You can't just appoint novices, you have to have people who know what they're doing. But at the same time this is an administration that's going to run very differently than typical Washington."

Mr Ryan said he agreed with Mr Trump's comments in a 'Wall Street Journal' interview published on Friday that he would keep elements of President Obama's signature healthcare law, known as Obamacare.

Repealing and replacing the 2010 Affordable Care Act was another centrepiece of Mr Trump's campaign. But he told the 'Journal' that after talking to Mr Obama at the White House on Thursday he would consider retaining provisions letting parents keep adult children up to age 26 on their insurance policies and barring insurers from denying coverage to people with pre-existing medical conditions.

"We can fix what is broken in healthcare without breaking what is working in healthcare," Mr Ryan said. "Obamacare is failing. It must be replaced. We're going to do that."

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