Tuesday 6 December 2016

Now that Donald Trump has won - The first 100 days of a Trump presidency

Ruth Sherlock

Published 09/11/2016 | 05:19

U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Wilmington, Ohio, U.S. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri/File Photo
U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump attends a campaign event in Wilmington, Ohio, U.S. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri/File Photo

DONALD TRUMP has promised that as president he will honour the pledge stitched into his white and red baseball caps: Make America Great Again.

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The former television entertainer’s campaign has been a roller coaster of triumphs and pitfalls, but his love for hyperbole has never wavered.

With him in the White House, Mr Trump has said, his supporters are going to "win so big"  they will soon be "sick of winning".

When it comes to mapping out the details of a Trump presidency, the Republican candidate has been no less extravagant.

It is customary in American presidential elections that a candidate sets out a vision for their first term in the Oval office.

But ever keen to be “the greatest”, Mr Trump has slashed the timeline of his proposals from 100 days to one. 

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president of the United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president of the United States. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president of the United States. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Chairman of the Republican National Committee (RNC) Reince Priebus (R) hugs Republican presidential elect Donald Trump during election night at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 9, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSONJIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images
People cheer as voting results for Florida come in at Republican presidential nominee Donald Trumps election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown on November 8, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Republican presidential elect Donald Trump gestures while speaking during election night at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 9, 2016. Photo: Getty
Republican presidential elect Donald Trump (L) gestures next to his family as he arrives to speak during election night at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York
Republican president-elect Donald Trump embraces his wife Melania Trump during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president of the United States. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Republican president-elect Donald Trump embraces his wife Melania Trump during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican National Committee, delivers a speech as Republican president-elect Donald Trump looks on during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president of the United States. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican National Committee, delivers a speech as Republican president-elect Donald Trump looks on during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president of the United States. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Republican presidential elect Donald Trump (L) arrives with his family on stage to speak during election night at the New York Hilton Midtown in New York on November 9, 2016. Trump stunned America and the world Wednesday, riding a wave of populist resentment to defeat Hillary Clinton in the race to become the 45th president of the United States. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGANMANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Republican president-elect Donald Trump gives greets people in the crowd after delivering his acceptance speech at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president of the United States. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Campaign chairman John Podesta speaks on stage at Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center November 9, 2016 in New York City. Clinton is running against Republican nominee, Donald J. Trump to be the 45th President of the United States. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Hillary Clinton tweeted "Whatever happens tonight, thank you for everything."/ Pic via @HillaryClinton
A graphic depicting Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump squaring off in a boxing ring sits in Times Square on November 8, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
The Trump family and team watch the results (Photo: Twitter/Donald Trump)
Jake Krupa colors in an electoral map as states projected for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump or Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at an election watching party in Coconut Grove, Florida. AFP PHOTO / RHONA WISERHONA WISE/AFP/Getty Images
The dollar tumbled against the yen and euro while the Mexican peso fell off a cliff as polling results in the knife-edge US presidential race pointed to a strong showing by Donald Trump. AFP PHOTO / BEHROUZ MEHRIBEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images
Ivanka Trump tweets: "Such a surreal moment to vote for my father for President of the United States! Make your voice heard and vote! #Election2016" Pic via Twitter/ @IvankaTrump
People watch voting results at Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
A woman reacts as she watches voting results at Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's election night event at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
People cheer at Republican presidential nominee Donald Trumps election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown on November 8, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
An employee of a foreign exchange trading company stands in front of a monitor displaying Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton (L) and Republican presidential nominee (Photo by Yuya Shino/Getty Images)
A police officer stands outside Trump Tower in New York City on election day November 8, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / DOMINICK REUTERDOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images
People vote on the US presidential election at Santa Monica City Hall on November 8, 2016 in Santa Monica, California / AFP PHOTO / Frederic J. BROWNFREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images
Nicolette Janoski displays a sticker after voting on November 8, 2016 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Ron Jenkins/Getty Images)
Voters cast ballots at a laundrette in Chicago, Illinois Picture: AFP/Getty
People cheer as voting results for Iowa come in at Republican presidential nominee Donald Trumps election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown on November 8, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Donald Trump’s son Eric glances across at the ballot being filled by his wife Lara Yunasska while voting at the 53rd Street Library in New York. Photo: Bloomberg
A man poses for a picture near the cardboard cutouts of U.S. presidential nominees Hillary Clinton (L) and Donald Trump, at an election event hosted at the U.S. ambassador's residence in Kathmandu, Nepal November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar
Supporters of U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton react at her election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
A supporter of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton bows her head at an election night rally in New York, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A supporter of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump holds up a Trump doll during an election night party at a hotel in downtown Phoenix, Arizona on November 8, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / Laura SegallLAURA SEGALL/AFP/Getty Images
People watch elections results during election night at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York on November 9, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / DON EMMERTDON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images
People gather around Times Square to view televised results of the US presidential election on November 9, 2016 in New York. / AFP PHOTO / EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZEDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images
Supporters of U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton react at her election night rally in Manhattan, New York, U.S., November 8, 2016. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A man leans out of a Hummer shouting words in support of U.S. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump while driving through Times Square in New York, U.S., November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich

At an address delivered in historic Gettysburg last month,  Mr Trump laid out a “contract with the American people” that would begin with a “very busy first day”.

He proceeded to detail 24-hours designed to erase traces of Barack Obama's presidency and set America on a protectionist, nativist, track.

Immigration

Mr Trump's rhetoric on immigration came to define his presidential campaign.

Though slightly more carefully worded, his proposal once in office remains some of the most divisive legislation on the issue.

He has quietly dropped his call to remove all undocumented immigrants from the US, a move that, aside from being so impractical it might be impossible, experts have warned would damage the US economy by taking too many people out of the labour market.

Instead he would immediately begin the process of deporting illegal immigrants with criminal records.

Recent studies estimate there are fewer than 168,000 such people in the United States.  But Mr Trump put the number at some two million, suggesting his calculations of "criminals", people who have had minor run-ins with the law, such as getting a speeding ticket.

He will also "suspend immigration from terror-prone regions where vetting cannot safely occur".

Though the terminology is vague, Syria would almost certainly be on this list. Mr Trump has claimed that the government "does not know" who the refugees it lets in are from the country, despite their being scrutinised for up to two years before being allowed to enter the US.

And last but not least there is the wall. This would not happen on his first day, he admits, but eventually a Trump administration would push through legislation "build a wall" along the southern border of the United States and make Mexico bear the costs. 

He has not however, explained in detail how this would happen.

Reform Washington

Donald Trump has promised to "drain the swamp" of big money Washington politics.

In one of his most popular campaign pitches, he has said he will "reduce the corrupting influence of special interests".

Speaking in Gettysburg, at the site where in 1863 Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous speech to unite Americans, Mr Trump sought to mimic the legendary leader, promising to reinstate a government “of, by and for the people”.

His day one reforms include a include a constitutional amendment to impose term limits on all members of congress and a five-year-ban on White House and Congressional officials becoming lobbyists after they leave government service.

In an effort to shrink the size of government the nominee called for a hiring freeze on all federal employees to reduce its workforce through attrition (exempting military, public safety, and public health). 

Trade

A Trump presidency would break from the traditional Republican commitment to free trade, imposing a set of protectionist policies to close America's economic borders.

He will immediately announce his intention to "renegotiate" the North American Free Trade agreement with Canada and Mexico.

He would cancel participation in the Tran-Pacific Partnership, a controversial trade arrangement with 12 countries.

The pact aims to deepen economic ties between these nations, slashing tariffs and fostering trade to boost growth. But critics argue that it will also also intensify competition between countries' labour forces.

Foreign Policy

Donald Trump has said that as president he may not guarantee protection to fellow NATO countries who come under attack.

In an interview just before the Republican convention Mr Trump said America would help only if that country had fulfilled its "obligations" within the alliance.

It marked the first time in post-World War Two era that a candidate for president suggested putting conditions on America's defense of its key allies.

Advocating an ultra "America first" view of the world Mr Trump has also threatened to withdraw troops from Europe and Asia if those allies fail to pay more for American protection.

Mr Trump has flip-flopped on key issues including Syria. Most recently the candidate implied that he sees Bashar al-Assad, the country's dictator, as the lesser evil when compared with US backed rebel opposition groups, some of whom have Islamist leanings.

He has promised to "bomb the hell" out of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.

Energy and the environment

In a deeply disappointing development for environmentalists, Mr Trump plans to cancel billions of dollars in payments to the United Nations climate change programs.

He has said he would redirect the funds to pay for infrastructure projects in the US.

He has also promised to lift restrictions on fracking and boost American oil and natural gas production.

He would lift roadblocks to the Keystone Pipeline. Environmental activists fought hard to convince the Obama administration to stop the infrastructure project, warning against the effects of the increase in oil production.

It’s path between Alberta, Canada and Nebraska in the United States was also said to damage fragile ecosystems.

Wipe Barack Obama from the history books

One of Mr Trump's first actions will be to try to erase the effects of Mr Obama's presidency.

The Republican candidate has promised to cancel every "executive action, memorandum and order issued by President Obama".

According to Stephen Moore, an official campaign adviser, the campaign has sought to identify “maybe twenty-five executive orders” that their candidate could reverse:  “Trump spends several hours signing papers—and erases the Obama Presidency,” he said.

Chief among them is the Affordable Care Act. Also known as “Obamacare”, the president’s signature policy has brought health insurance to some 12.7 million people who would have struggled to afford medical cover.

But it has also pushed up insurance premiums for Americans not on government assistance.

Mr Trump would replace this with another, system, the “Health Savings Accounts”. This plan would give more power to states over how to handle funds.

But beyond that critics have said that the Trump campaign has failed to explain how it differs significantly from Mr Obama’s healthcare plan, and how they would implement it.

Like with much of his presidential campaign, Mr Trump appears to be asking the American people to trust him and wait and see.

Telegraph.co.uk

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