Thursday 29 September 2016

Armed clashes feared at convention as Republicans finally crown Trump

Ruth Sherlock

Published 18/07/2016 | 02:30

Mr Trump reinforced his message that he was running for president as a 'law and order' candidate. REUTERS
Mr Trump reinforced his message that he was running for president as a 'law and order' candidate. REUTERS

The state of race relations in America looks set to dominate this week's Republican National Convention as a host of campaign groups descended on Cleveland last night to make a stand against one of the most divisive politicians in modern American history.

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Groups campaigning against racism, Islamophobia, attacks on immigrants and the LGBTQ community were all gearing up to protest against billionaire Donald Trump, pictured, who will be officially crowned the party's presidential nominee tomorrow.

Protestors carry a papier-mache pig with a Donald Trump wig amid preparations for the arrival of visitors and delegates for the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio. AFP/Getty Images
Protestors carry a papier-mache pig with a Donald Trump wig amid preparations for the arrival of visitors and delegates for the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio. AFP/Getty Images

But in the wake of deadly attacks against police officers, and the high-profile killings of black men at the hands of police, race relations is expected be the flashpoint around Mr Trump, who has frequently stoked racial tensions.

In the wake of yesterday's shooting of police officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana - already reeling in the aftermath of the killing of Alton Sterling - Mr Trump reinforced his message that he was running for president as a "law and order" candidate.

The head of the Cleveland police union yesterday urged Ohio's governor to declare a state of emergency and to suspend laws allowing the open carrying of firearms during the convention, after the shooting of six police officers in Louisiana.

The New Black Panthers, considered an extremist black rights group, are just one of the organisations who have arrived in Cleveland to protest his appointment. White supremacist groups have also been organising themselves, via Facebook and social media, to stage marches in support of Mr Trump at the convention, sparking fears of violent clashes between the two sides in a state where it is legal to carry firearms. (©Daily Telegraph, London)

A man wearing a mask of Donald Trump walks through downtown ahead of the upcoming Republican National Convention. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
A man wearing a mask of Donald Trump walks through downtown ahead of the upcoming Republican National Convention. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Telegraph.co.uk

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