Sunday 24 September 2017

Trump 'wasn't aware of what scrapping DACA meant' before young immigrant programme decision

People stand in silence with candles and signs during a silent vigil in honor of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) at T.B. Butler Fountain Plaza in Tyler, Texas, on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (Chelsea Purgahn/Tyler Morning Telegraph)
People stand in silence with candles and signs during a silent vigil in honor of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) at T.B. Butler Fountain Plaza in Tyler, Texas, on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (Chelsea Purgahn/Tyler Morning Telegraph)
Martha Waggonner, Walker Waggonner, Katie Powell and Gail McGlothin stand in silence holding candles and signs during a silent vigil in honor of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) at T.B. Butler Fountain Plaza in Tyler, Texas, on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017.(Chelsea Purgahn/Tyler Morning Telegraph)
Robert E. Lee student Karina Fraga, a DACA recipient, closes her eyes in prayer as she holds a sign during a silent vigil in honor of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) at T.B. Butler Fountain Plaza in Tyler, Texas, on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (Chelsea Purgahn/Tyler Morning Telegraph)
Santa Ana resident Alfonso Rivas yells with all others as he makes his support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, in Santa Ana, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (Cindy Yamanaka/The Orange County Register via AP)
Vivian Garcia Cruz, 18, a self-described DACA student speaks at a rally in St. Louis' Kiener Plaza on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, as supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals gather to voice their opposition to President Trump's decision to end the federal program from the Obama administration. (Christian Gooden/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
People hold up a banner during an event to protest President Donald Trump's decision to revoke the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, in Las Vegas.(AP Photo/John Locher)
Judy Weatherly, a supporter of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), holds up a sign during a protest outside of the Federal Building in San Francisco, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
Catalina Morales to speak to the crowd in front of the Hennepin County Jail after marching through Minneapolis to protest against the announcement that the Trump administration is ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (Renee Jones Schneider/Star Tribune via AP)
From left, June Kuoch, 20, and Shamsa Ahmed, 18 march during a protest against the announcement that the Trump administration is ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, in Minneapolis, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (Renee Jones Schneider/Star Tribune via AP)
A large crowd marches during a protest against the announcement that the Trump administration is ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, in Minneapolis, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (Renee Jones Schneider/Star Tribune via AP)
Supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) yell during a protest outside of the Federal Building in San Francisco, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
Supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) yell during a protest outside of the Federal Building in San Francisco, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
Supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) yell during a protest outside of the Federal Building in San Francisco, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
Evelin Hernandez cries as she hold a sign reading "My dreams matter. Don't shatter them." at a protest against the announcement that the Trump administration is ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, in Minneapolis, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (Renee Jones Schneider/Star Tribune via AP)
Alliance San Diego and other Pro-DACA supporters hold a protest rally, following U.S. President Donald Trump's DACA announcement, in front of San Diego County Administration Center in San Diego, California, U.S., September 5, 2017. REUTERS/John Gastaldo

Clark Mindock

White House officials have raised concerns that Donald Trump didn’t completely grasp the implications of ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program before he made a decision about its future.

Administration officials privately fretted that Mr Trump may have not understood exactly what effects rescinding DACA could have, according to a report from the New York Times.

Mr Trump’s administration has since then has attempted to cede responsibility for the policy, and said that it is now up to Congress to determine a legislative future for the program.

Since its implementation in 2012, as many as 800,000 young undocumented immigrants in the US have applied for the protected status, which grants work visas to people who came to the United States illegally at a very young age.

“The program known as DACA that was effectuated under the Obama administration is being rescinded,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Tuesday, announcing a six-month sunset for the program.

Mr Sessions indicated that the program would be phased out and that new applications from people hoping to become DACA recipients would not be taken going forward.

Martha Waggonner, Walker Waggonner, Katie Powell and Gail McGlothin stand in silence holding candles and signs during a silent vigil in honor of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) at T.B. Butler Fountain Plaza in Tyler, Texas, on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017.(Chelsea Purgahn/Tyler Morning Telegraph)
Martha Waggonner, Walker Waggonner, Katie Powell and Gail McGlothin stand in silence holding candles and signs during a silent vigil in honor of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) at T.B. Butler Fountain Plaza in Tyler, Texas, on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017.(Chelsea Purgahn/Tyler Morning Telegraph)

Mr Trump built his campaign in large part by taking a tough-on-illegal immigration stance that many in the Republican primary were hesitant to embrace. The President, during the campaign, promised mass deportations of individuals without legal status in the US — a group that includes an estimated 11 million people.

Deportation courts in the United States are already backlogged, however, and it is unclear if deporting that many people is even possible.

Santa Ana resident Alfonso Rivas yells with all others as he makes his support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, in Santa Ana, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (Cindy Yamanaka/The Orange County Register via AP)
Santa Ana resident Alfonso Rivas yells with all others as he makes his support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, in Santa Ana, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (Cindy Yamanaka/The Orange County Register via AP)

In the first six months of his presidency, Mr Trump’s administration issued 57,069 deportation orders, an increase of 31 per cent over the same period the year prior when Barack Obama was still in office. Of those, 16,058 people fought and won their immigration cases, or had them closed, which allowed them to stay in the United States.

Vivian Garcia Cruz, 18, a self-described DACA student speaks at a rally in St. Louis' Kiener Plaza on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, as supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals gather to voice their opposition to President Trump's decision to end the federal program from the Obama administration. (Christian Gooden/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
Vivian Garcia Cruz, 18, a self-described DACA student speaks at a rally in St. Louis' Kiener Plaza on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, as supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals gather to voice their opposition to President Trump's decision to end the federal program from the Obama administration. (Christian Gooden/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)

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