Tuesday 26 September 2017

A weakened Hurricane Irma makes second landfall in Florida

  • Hurricane makes second Florida landfall at Marco Island
  • Curfews ordered amid looting in several counties
  • Storm downgraded to Category 2 as it nears Fort Myers
  • Trump calls storm "some big monster"
Vehicles drive through a flooded street as Hurricane Irma passes through Naples, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Vehicles drive through a flooded street as Hurricane Irma passes through Naples, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Robin Respaut, Zachary Fagenson and Kathy Armstrong

A weakening but still potent Hurricane Irma lashed Florida's Gulf Coast on Sunday with tree-bending winds, pounding rain and surging surf, leaving millions of homes without power, while flooding streets and swaying skyscrapers across the state in Miami.

In storm-battered towns up and down Florida's western shore - from Naples and Fort Myers north through Sarasota, Tampa and St. Petersburg - residents huddled with relatives, neighbors and pets to ride out a hurricane that had ranked as one of the Atlantic's most powerful in a century.

Hurricane-force winds extended across portions of central Florida on Sunday night, the National Hurricane Center reported.

"I've lived here 21 years, and I never imagined we'd get a direct hit," Shelli Connelly, 55, said as she stood on the sixth-floor balcony of her high-rise condo on Marco Island, where Irma made its second Florida landfall hours after barreling through the resort archipelago of the Florida Keys.

Downed trees and floodwater cover a driveway on Sunray Drive in Bonita Springs, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017, as Hurricane Irma passes. (Nicole Raucheisen/Naples Daily News via AP)
Downed trees and floodwater cover a driveway on Sunray Drive in Bonita Springs, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017, as Hurricane Irma passes. (Nicole Raucheisen/Naples Daily News via AP)
Vehicles drive through a flooded street as Hurricane Irma passes through Naples, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
A tourist from Chile drinks rum on the beach a day after the passage of Hurricane Irma in Varadero, Cuba, September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini
In this geocolor GOES-16 satellite image taken Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017, at 22:00 UTC, the eye of Hurricane Irma moves up Florida's west coast. Hurricane Irma gave Florida a coast-to-coast pummeling with winds up to 130 mph Sunday, swamping homes and boats, knocking out power to millions and toppling massive construction cranes over the Miami skyline. (NOAA via AP)
Tourists enjoy a beach a day after the passage of Hurricane Irma in Varadero, Cuba, September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini
Floodwater fills Meadow Lane in Bonita Springs, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017, as Hurricane Irma passes. (Nicole Raucheisen/Naples Daily News via AP)
A rough surf surrounds Boynton Beach inlet as Hurricane Irma hits in Boynton Beach, Fla. (Jim Rassol/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)
People tend to a car that flipped over on Cape Coral Parkway during Hurricane Irma, in Cape Coral, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Vehicles are surrounded by water after Hurricane Irma passed through Naples, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
A downed tree lies across Cape Coral Parkway during Hurricane Irma in downtown Cape Coral, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
A tourist stands on the beach a day after the passage of Hurricane Irma in Varadero, Cuba, September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Alexandre Meneghini
The crumbled canopy of a gas station damaged by Hurricane Irma is seen in Bonita Springs, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
Flood water from Hurricane Irma surround a damaged mobile home in Bonita Springs, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston
The Tampa skyline is seen in the background as local residents (L-R) Rony Ordonez, Jean Dejesus and Henry Gallego take photographs after walking into Hillsborough Bay ahead of Hurricane Irma in Tampa, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A local resident walks across a flooded street in downtown Miami as Hurricane Irma arrives at south Florida, U.S. September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A boat at anchor in the Intercostal Waterway is pictured as Hurricane Irma' arrives in Hollywood, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A boat rack storage facility lays destroyed after Hurricane Irma blew though Hollywood, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A gas station sign lays destroyed after Hurricane Irma blew though Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Flamingos stand on straw bedding in a secure room after the flock at Busch Gardens Tampa Bay was herded to safety due to the approach of Hurricane Irma in Tampa, Florida, U.S. September 10, 2017. Busch Gardens Tampa Bay/Handout via REUTERS. ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS TAKEN BY A THIRD PARTY. NO SALES, NO ARCHIVES.
Flooding in the Brickell neighborhood as Hurricane Irma passes Miami, Florida, U.S. September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Yang
Flooding in the Brickell neighborhood as Hurricane Irma passes Miami, Florida, U.S. September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Yang
Flooding in the Brickell neighborhood as Hurricane Irma passes Miami, Florida, U.S. September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Yang
Palm trees sway as the wind blows and water rises at an evacuated recreational vehicle park as hurricane Irma approaches Fort Myers Beach, Florida, U.S., September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Bryan Woolston TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A woman keeps her shoes dry on a piece of foam board while wading through a flooded street, after the passing of Hurricane Irma, in Havana, Cuba September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer NO SALES. NO ARCHIVES TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Destroyed roofs at a residential areas are seen as Hurricane Irma passes south Florida, in Miami, U.S. September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A truck is seen turned over as Hurricane Irma passes south Florida, in Miami, U.S. September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A man sits in the window of a flooded house, after the passing of Hurricane Irma, in Havana, Cuba September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer
A man helps a girl with a swim float as she plays in a flooded street, after the passing of Hurricane Irma, in Havana, Cuba September 10, 2017.
People are seen in a flooded street, after the passing of Hurricane Irma, in Havana, Cuba September 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stringer

Opting to stay put with her four dogs rather than join evacuations, Connelly said the experience was "very scary."

 

"You saw the doors moving, the chandeliers shaking. It was very loud," she told Reuters as she watched the storm surge move in from the Gulf of Mexico following fierce winds that blew out windows in nearby buildings, stripped trees and slammed cars together in the parking lot below.

The storm killed at least 28 people as it raged through the Caribbean en route to Florida. On Sunday, Irma claimed its first US fatality - a man found dead in a pickup truck that had crashed into a tree in high winds in the town of Marathon, in the Keys.

Officials in Orange County, which includes the central Florida resort city of Orlando, reported a US second fatality, from a single-car crash that was apparently storm-related.

Irma's center came ashore at Marco Island not long after it was downgraded to a Category 3 storm from a Category 4 on the five-point Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale, with maximum sustained winds of 120 miles per hour (195 kph).

A few hours later, it was downgraded again to Category 2, with maximum sustained wind gusts of 110 mph (175 kph).

WEATHER (208).jpg
Downed trees and floodwater cover a driveway on Sunray Drive in Bonita Springs, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017, as Hurricane Irma passes. (Nicole Raucheisen/Naples Daily News via AP)

Irma was forecast to continue churning northward along Florida's Gulf Coast through the night, further weakening along the way before diminishing to tropical-storm status over far northern Florida or southern Georgia on Monday.

Forecasters warned that Irma remained dangerous as it toppled power lines, tore up roofs and threatened coastal areas with storm surges as high as 15 feet (4.6 m). Tornadoes were also spotted through the southern part of the state.

By late Sunday, at least 4.4 million homes and businesses had lost power, according to Florida Power & Light and other utilities.

Aerial video footage broadcast by local television showed what appeared to be extensive flooding of a mobile-home park in Naples, an upscale beach town about a dozen miles (19 km) north of Marco Island. Emergency officials in surrounding Collier County warned late on Sunday that floodwaters were still rising in Naples, but the overall scope of storm surge predictions was scaled back somewhat from earlier in the day.

WEATHER (13).jpg
Vehicles drive through a flooded street as Hurricane Irma passes through Naples, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Some 6.5 million people, about a third of the state's population, had been ordered to evacuate southern Florida as the storm approached the US mainland after pummeling Cuba with 36-foot-tall (11-m) waves and ravaging several smaller Caribbean islands.

An estimated 170,000 people were lodged in some 650 emergency shelters as of early evening, according to the Florida Division of Emergency Management. Residents across South Florida were advised to remain indoors to avoid hazards posed by downed traffic signals, fallen power lines and debris that made local roads unsafe for travel.

"This is a life-threatening situation," Governor Rick Scott told a news conference. Curfews were being enforced in numerous communities on Sunday evening, including Tampa, St. Petersburg, Orlando and Miami, as several Florida counties reported arrests of looters taking advantage of homes left vacant by evacuations.

MIAMI SPARED THE WORST

The storm's westward tilt to Florida's Gulf Coast spared the densely populated Miami area the brunt of its wrath, but the state's biggest city was anything but unscathed.

Miami apartment towers swayed in the high winds, two construction cranes were toppled, and small white-capped waves could be seen in flooded streets between Miami office towers.

One woman in Miami's Little Haiti neighborhood was forced to deliver her own baby because emergency responders were unable to reach her, the city of Miami said on Twitter. Mother and infant were later taken to a hospital, it said.

Waves poured over a Miami seawall, flooding streets waist-deep in places around Brickell Avenue, which runs a couple of blocks from the waterfront through the financial district and past foreign consulates. High-rise apartment buildings were left standing like islands in the flood.

"We feel the building swaying all the time," restaurant owner Deme Lomas said in a phone interview from his 35th-floor apartment. "It's like being on a ship."

Last week, Irma ranked as one of the most powerful hurricanes ever documented in the Atlantic, one of only a handful of Category 5 storms known to have packed sustained winds at 185 mph (297 kph)or more.

Irma is expected to cause billions of dollars in damage to the third-most-populous US state, a major tourism hub with an economy that generates about 5 percent of US gross domestic product.

Miami International Airport was slated to be closed to commercial airline traffic on Monday.

On Marco Island, home to about 17,000 residents, 67-year-old Kathleen Tuttle and her husband rode out the storm on the second floor of a friend's condominium after failing to find a flight out. She feared for her canal-facing home.

"I'm feeling better than being in my house, but I'm worried about my home, about what’s going to happen," Tuttle said.

"I am prepared to say goodbye to my things, and that is hard," Allison McCarthy Cruse, 42, said as she huddled with seven other adults, three children and seven dogs in the home of a neighbor just blocks from the water in St. Petersburg. She said she feared the roof on her own house might not survive.

Irma comes just days after Hurricane Harvey dumped record-breaking rain in Texas, killing at least 60 people and causing unprecedented flooding and an estimated $180 billion in property damage. Almost three months remain in the Atlantic hurricane season, which runs through November.

US President Donald Trump, acting at the governor's request, approved a major disaster declaration for Florida on Sunday, freeing up emergency federal aid in response to Irma, which he called "some big monster."

IRISH FAMILY FEAR FOR THEIR HOME

An Irish mother living in Florida tolld Independent.ie she is terrified her house will collapse.

Mairead O'Higgins is living in Sarasota and had originally hoped to avoid the worst of the storm.

"It's awful, absolutely awful, we're just waiting and not knowing what could happen, that's the worst part," she said.

"We haven't got a storm shelter so we've taken the internal doors down and have put them up against the windows.

"We know the windows will blow out but I just hope that the complex doesn't collapse into itself."

Ms O'Higgins, who is originally from Rathgar in Dublin,  has been living in Florida for a year with her three children and said they were expected to get the tail end of Irma but ended up in the eye of it.

 "It's very scary, a lot of people tried to evacuate but were unable to get out because the roads are so filled.

"There's also a shortage of gas and people are afraid of running out on the highway.

"Nobody here has ever experienced anything of this magnitude, we're watching the weather and it's scary beyond belief," she said.

"You have to be residents to get any aid so we don't qualify.

"We also were not able to take out insurance.

"It's scary as we've no other family here, it's just ourselves.

"the British and Canadian governments have said they will help any residents here who are affected by Irma so I'm hoping that the Irish government will say the same."

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