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Wednesday 1 October 2014

Monica Lewsinky - ready to take charge of how she's seen

Published 03/08/2014 | 02:30

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Former White House intern Monica Lewinsky is pictured arriving at her lawyer's offices in Washington July 28, 1998. Lewinsky, the onetime White House intern whose 1990s affair with Bill Clinton nearly brought down his presidency, recently broke her long silence - saying she regretted what had happened.  (REUTERS/Tim Aubry/Files)
Former White House intern Monica Lewinsky is pictured arriving at her lawyer's offices in Washington July 28, 1998. Lewinsky, the onetime White House intern whose 1990s affair with Bill Clinton nearly brought down his presidency, recently broke her long silence - saying she regretted what had happened. (REUTERS/Tim Aubry/Files)

Monica Lewsinky has finally landed a job - as a contributor for Vanity Fair magazine. Just six weeks after the 40-year-old made a splash with a compelling account of the fallout she suffered in the wake of the Clinton Sex scandal, Lewsinky published her first post on Vanityfair.com Thursday comparing her plight to the plotline in the Netflix prison comedy Orange is the New Black.

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"On occasion it crosses my mind that I too was once threatened with being locked up - by prosecutors involved in the investigation of 1998," she writes. "At one point during intense negotiation, one of the lawyers defending me said, in confidence, 'You better think carefully on this, Monica, or you'll find yourself in an orange jumpsuit.' 'Orange,' I remarked, 'is not my colour.'"

Recently, while watching Episode 11/Season 1, Lewinsky says she was stunned to see "a vulgar reference to my last name and DNA. I did what I usually do in these situations where the culture throws me a shard of my former self. After the cringing embarrassment, the whiff of shame, and the sense that I am no longer an agent running my own life, I shuddered, I got up off the sofa, and I turned it off."

Her point: no more hiding out. Instead of hanging her head in shame, Lewsinky says she is determined to learn from others who have have "lost command of their public narratives...They refuse to have their identities swindled or misshapen. Instead, they take charge. They turn the attack on its head and use it as an opportunity for self-definition, instead of just taking blood as they go down."

Team HRC was probably less than thrilled to learn that Lewsinky's brief for the magazine, which also has Pippa Middleton on its payroll, is broad. "There is no set schedule or subject area," spokeswoman Beth Kseniak said when confirming Lewsinky's appointment, "But she and her editor are on the lookout for relevant topics of interest."

 

Tune into the Bush telegraph

In political news of a different stripe, the artist formerly known as president George W. Bush (and, in some circles, the never-good-enough-son) is set to tell all about his relationship with her father, former president George HW Bush. The unique and complicated bond between the two men, which has intrigued Washington types for years, will form the spine of the 300-page homage to the elder Bush to be released on Nov. 11.

"As the only father and son to each have served as President of the United States since John and John Quincy Adams, George HW Bush and George W Bush occupy a unique position in history," Crown publisher Maya Majvee said in a statement which described the book as "heartfelt, intimate, and illuminating."

While the bio will cover much of Bush Snr's life and career - from his days as a World War II aviator to his rise in the Texas oil business, his work in Congress and director of the CIA as well as his term in the White House - the selling point of the biography will be Jr's perspective on his father's influence over his life from a "childhood in West Texas to his early campaign trips with his father, and from his decision to go into politics to his own two-term presidency."

Bush 41, who celebrated his 90th birthday in June with a sky-dive, is one of the few presidents in modern times not to have written a memoir - a void that will also be filled by George H. W. Bush: Character at the Core, by former Bush speech writer Curt Smith which is scheduled to come out this autumn.

 

Farrow's name up in lights

Mia Farrow knows how to stage a comeback. The 69-year-old, who has spent much of the last decade bouncing between between activist duties and tabloid tussles, stands poised to break box-office records when she squares off against Brian Dennehy in a Broadway revival of A. R. Gurney's Love Letters on September 13. The show, which is being produced by Nelle (The Trip to Bountiful) Nugent, will run through January with a rotating cast that changes each month. Dennehy will do double duty appearing with Carol Burnett in October, followed by Alan Alda and Candice Bergen (November) Stacy Keach and Diana Rigg (December) and Anjelica Huston and Martin Sheen (January).

"Even if you've seen it, you will want to see how each new actor approaches the material," Nugent said at a press conference to introduce the novel production. "We look at the choices they made, and wonder if there are second chances," she added suggesting audience members "bring your hankies.

 

Martin on the uncoupling

Chris Martin is talking more about his relationship with soon-to-be-ex-wife Gywneth Paltrow in the four months since they split than he ever did during the 10 years they were married.

On Thursday, Martin tried to clarify the couple's confusing post-breakup status to Ryan Seacrest. "I'm not the best interviewee on this kind of thing, but we're friends and proud parents," Martin said, referring to daughter Apple, 10, and son Moses, 6. "There's lots of love, and that's it."

The Coldplay frontman was equally reticent when he tried to explain the pair's conscious uncoupling on a radio show the previous 
Friday. "The truth is...well, I don't really love talking about this stuff," Martin said before giving it his best shot. "But ~
the thing we told everyone at the beginning of the year is true. We are very close. We are not together. But we're, you know, that's the truth and that's it."

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