Monday 23 October 2017

UN's desperate bid to salvage peace as Russia backs Assad's regime

Mourners gather at a mass burial for the victims of an artillery barrage from Syrian forces in Houla.
Mourners gather at a mass burial for the victims of an artillery barrage from Syrian forces in Houla.

Shaun Walker in Moscow and Patrick Cockburn in Damascus

Kofi Annan arrived in Damascus yesterday in a desperate bid to rescue his peace plan and prevent Syria from sinking deeper into civil war.

But hopes of a united international front were dashed when Russia refused to unequivocally condemn Bashar al-Assad's regime for the Houla massacre.

Mr Annan held talks with the Syrian President while the British foreign secretary, William Hague, sat through a tense press conference in Moscow in which his Russian counterpart, Sergei Lavrov, insisted that all sides shared the blame for the massacres of the past few days.

Russia's backing of a UN Security Council statement condemning the deaths on Friday of more than 100 civilians in Houla had raised hopes that Moscow may finally relax its opposition to putting real pressure on Mr Assad's regime, which Russia views as a key ally in a volatile region.

Conceded

Mr Lavrov conceded that government forces bore the main responsibility for the massacre, but insisted that the presence of knife and bullet wounds on some corpses meant the opposition was also involved. Mr Lavrov also suggested that recent bombings in Syria bore "all the hallmarks of al-Qa'ida".

He said: "We are dealing with a situation in which both sides evidently had a hand in the deaths of innocent people."

Mr Lavrov also repeatedly accused other nations of egging the rebels on and pushing them to break the ceasefire and provoke a response from Mr Assad's forces, in the hope of forcing international intervention. "All the parties involved need to be playing the same tune," Mr Lavrov said.

"We should be attempting to implement the peace plan and not trying to change the regime. It's time to choose between pursuing geopolitical goals and saving lives."

As Mr Annan arrived in Syria -- a country still coming to terms with the deaths of 108 people that include dozens of women and children in Houla -- there were reports of escalating fighting in the central city of Hama, where the opposition says Syrian army artillery barrages have killed 41 people. "I am personally shocked and horrified by the tragic incident in Houla two days ago, which took so many innocent lives, children, women and men," Mr Annan said before entering talks with Mr Assad and other senior officials.

The UN's peace envoy said that all sides of the conflict had to end the bloodshed, insisting that "this message of peace is not only for the government, but for everyone with a gun".

Mr Annan's original plan envisioned a ceasefire beginning on April 12, but it is now being broken on a daily basis, according to the UN monitoring team. Few Syrians expect Mr Assad or the leadership of the regime he represents to consider giving up or even sharing power unless they face the prospect of losing their last allies. (© Independent News Service, London)

Irish Independent

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