Saturday 10 December 2016

Pro-Kurdish party blames Turkey for 'massacre'

Darren Butler in Ankara

Published 26/06/2015 | 02:30

A wounded boy is brought to the local hospital at Suruc in Turkey’s Sanliurfa province yesterday, across the border from the Syrian town of Kobane, the scene of a fresh attack by Isil jihadists
A wounded boy is brought to the local hospital at Suruc in Turkey’s Sanliurfa province yesterday, across the border from the Syrian town of Kobane, the scene of a fresh attack by Isil jihadists
Smoke rises in the Syrian town of Kobane as it is seen from the Turkish border town of Suruc in Sanliurfa province, Turkey. Photo: Reuters
Syrian Kurds from Kobane walk to the border fences as they are pictured from the Turkish border town of Suruc in Sanliurfa province, Turkey. Photo: Reuters
An injured man from Syrian town of Kobane is carried to a hospital at the Turkish-Syrian border town of Suruc, in Sanliurfa province, Turkey. Photo: Reuters
A still image taken from CCTV on the Turkish side of the border captures an explosion moments after a car bomb detonates in the town of Kobane. Photo: AP

Turkey's pro-Kurdish party described an Isil attack on the Syrian border town of Kobane as a massacre and blamed it on Turkish state support for the militants, comments which will fuel tension in Ankara amid attempts to form a government.

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Isil fighters launched simultaneous attacks against the Syrian government and Kurdish militia overnight, with at least one car bomb in an area near the border crossing with Turkey.

Hospital officials said at least 15 people were killed and 70 wounded.

"The Turkish government has supported Isil for years. Today's massacre is a part of this support," said Figen Yuksekdag, the co-leader of the People's Democratic Party (HDP).

The pro-Kurdish HDP entered parliament for the first time after clearing a 10pc threshold in the June 7 elections.

Its success helped to deprive the governing AK Party, founded by President Tayyip Erdogan, of a majority for the first time in over a decade.

The AKP now needs to find a coalition partner.

"The remarks of Turkish politicians are null and void for us.

"It is up to the Turkish government to prove it does not support Isil," she added.

Turkey, a Sunni Muslim nation with a secular constitution, is a member of the US-led coalition against Isil, although its partners have urged it to do more.

Yuksekdag also told reporters there was a "high probability" that the attackers yesterday had entered Kobane from Turkey. Ankara has denied such allegations and said the attack was staged from Jarablus, to the west of Kobane.

Irish Independent

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