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Sunday 21 September 2014

Iraq crisis: Islamic State's message to America - 'We will drown you all in blood'

Lizzie Dearden

Published 19/08/2014 | 12:06

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Militant Islamist fighters wave flags as they take part in a military parade along the streets of Syria's northern Raqqa province. The fighters held the parade to celebrate their declaration of an Islamic "caliphate" after the group captured territory in neighbouring Iraq, a monitoring service said. The Islamic State, an al Qaeda offshoot previously known as Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), posted pictures online on Sunday of people waving black flags from cars and holding guns in the air, the SITE monitoring service said. REUTERS/Stringe
Militant Islamist fighters wave flags as they take part in a military parade along the streets of Syria's northern Raqqa province. REUTERS/Stringe

Islamic militants losing ground in Iraq under fire from US forces have threatened to launch terrorist attacks on American soil in revenge.

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A video posted online by the Islamic State (Isis) warned that Americans will be attacked “in any place” if air strikes continue to hit its fighters.

After showing footage of a US soldier apparently being killed by a sniper and a photo of an American beheaded during the Iraq occupation, a statement in English reads: “We will drown all of you in blood”.

In a previous message posted by Isis on Twitter last week said "we are in your state, we are in your cities, we are in your streets" with a picture of the Islamist black flag with the White House in the background.

Unlike al-Qa'ida, Isis has focused on gaining control of swathes of land and numerous towns and cities in Iraq and Syria rather than attacking Western targets.

Mass executions, kidnappings, beheadings and other atrocities have been reported during the group’s bloody rampage through northern Iraq.

Isis violently adheres to Sunni Islam and tens of thousands Shias, Christians and other religious minorities have been fleeing for their lives.

Displaced people from the minority Yazidi sect, fleeing the violence in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, re-enter Iraq from Syria at the Iraqi-Syrian border crossing in Fishkhabour, Dohuk Province, August 10, 2014. Displaced families from Iraq's minority Yazidi sect crossed the border into Syria on Sunday to escape violence in the town of Sinjar, according to Firat news agency. Islamic State militants have killed hundreds of Iraq's minority Yazidis, burying some alive and taking women as slaves, an Iraqi government minister said on Sunday, as U.S. warplanes again bombed the insurgents and a political deadlock dragged on. Picture taken August 10, 2014. REUTERS/Ari Jalal (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS CONFLICT SOCIETY)
Displaced people from the minority Yazidi sect, fleeing the violence in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, re-enter Iraq from Syria at the Iraqi-Syrian border crossing in Fishkhabour, Dohuk Province, August 10, 2014. REUTERS/Ari Jalal
Displaced people from the minority Yazidi sect, fleeing the violence in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, re-enter Iraq from Syria at the Iraqi-Syrian border crossing in Fishkhabour, Dohuk Province, August 10, 2014. Displaced families from Iraq's minority Yazidi sect crossed the border into Syria on Sunday to escape violence in the town of Sinjar, according to Firat news agency. Islamic State militants have killed hundreds of Iraq's minority Yazidis, burying some alive and taking women as slaves, an Iraqi government minister said on Sunday, as U.S. warplanes again bombed the insurgents and a political deadlock dragged on. Picture taken August 10, 2014. REUTERS/Ari Jalal (IRAQ- Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS CONFLICT SOCIETY)
Displaced people from the minority Yazidi sect, fleeing the violence in the Iraqi town of Sinjar, re-enter Iraq from Syria at the Iraqi-Syrian border crossing in Fishkhabour, Dohuk Province, August 10, 2014. REUTERS/Ari Jalal
Tech. Sgt. Lynn Morelly, 816th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron, C-17 Globemaster III loadmaster, watches bundles of halal meals parachute to the ground during a humanitarian airdrop mission over Iraq in this August 9, 2014 photo released on August 10, 2014. To date, in coordination with the government of Iraq, U.S. military aircraft have delivered more than 52,000 meals and more than 10,600 gallons of fresh drinking water, providing much-needed aid to the displaced Yazidis, who urgently require emergency assistance according to the U.S. Department of Defense. Picture taken on August 9, 2014.  REUTERS/Vernon Young Jr./U.S. Air Force/Handout  (IRAQ - Tags: MILITARY CONFLICT) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
Tech. Sgt. Lynn Morelly, 816th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron, C-17 Globemaster III loadmaster, watches bundles of halal meals parachute to the ground during a humanitarian airdrop mission over Iraq in this August 9, 2014 photo released on August 10, 2014. REUTERS/Vernon Young Jr./U.S. Air Force/Handout

Kurdish and Iraqi forces assisted by US air strikes have had some success in recent weeks reclaiming territory from the militants, who have threatened to march on the capital Baghdad.

Barack Obama approved the first American air strikes since the end of the occupation in 2011 earlier this month, saying the US could not “turn a blind eye” to genocide.

The attacks started as part of humanitarian efforts to help thousands of trapped Yazidis flee Mount Sinjar and have continued to help Kurdish and Iraqi forces drive back the jihadists.

The President claimed a tactical victory with the recapture of the Mosul dam, one of the largest in Iraq, and hailed the co-operation between government troops and Kurdish Peshmerga fighters on the ground.

“We are not reintroducing thousands of troops to engage in combat,” he insisted.

Displaced people, who fled from the violence in the province of Nineveh, arrive at Sulaimaniya province August 7, 2014. The United States began to drop relief supplies to beleaguered Yazidi refugees fleeing Islamist militants in Iraq, but there was no immediate sign on Friday of U.S. air strikes to halt the sweeping advance of Islamic State fighters. Picture taken August 7, 2014.  REUTERS/Stringer (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS CONFLICT MILITARY)
Displaced people, who fled from the violence in the province of Nineveh, arrive at Sulaimaniya province August 7, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer
Displaced people, who fled from the violence in the province of Nineveh, arrive at Sulaimaniya province August 7, 2014. The United States began to drop relief supplies to beleaguered Yazidi refugees fleeing Islamist militants in Iraq, but there was no immediate sign on Friday of U.S. air strikes to halt the sweeping advance of Islamic State fighters. Picture taken August 7, 2014.  REUTERS/Stringer (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS CONFLICT MILITARY)
Displaced people, who fled from the violence in the province of Nineveh, arrive at Sulaimaniya province August 7, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer
A member of the Kurdish peshmerga forces sit with a weapon during an intensive security deployment against Islamic State militants in Makhmur, on the outskirts of the province of Nineveh August 7, 2014. The United States began to drop relief supplies to beleaguered Yazidi refugees fleeing Islamist militants in Iraq, but there was no immediate sign on Friday of U.S. air strikes to halt the sweeping advance of Islamic State fighters. Picture taken August 7, 2014.  REUTERS/Stringer (IRAQ - Tags: CIVIL UNREST POLITICS CONFLICT MILITARY)
A member of the Kurdish peshmerga forces sit with a weapon during an intensive security deployment against Islamic State militants in Makhmur, on the outskirts of the province of Nineveh August 7, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

David Cameron has said British troops will not be sent in after reports that UK "military assets" entered the country to help humanitarian operations.

(Independent.co.uk)

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