Friday 9 December 2016

Two killed as Hurricane Newton hits Mexico's famed Los Cabos resorts

Ignacio Martinez

Published 07/09/2016 | 06:36

Firemen removed a palm tree felled by Hurricane Newton in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Firemen removed a palm tree felled by Hurricane Newton in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Residents stand next to debris of a restaurant in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo
Tourists play at a beach in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo
Tourists have a beer at a bar using sand bags to protect from floodwaters in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo
Tourists play at a beach in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo
Tourists walk past a debris-filled area in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo
Firefighters cut the trunk of a fallen tree in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo
Residents of an impoverished neighbourhood raise a power line damaged in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo
Two men shovel sand deposited by Hurricane Newton, from inside a restaurant in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 6 2016. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
People help a tourist move his car after it became stuck in the sand, after the passing of Hurricane Newton in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, Tuesday Sept. 6, 2016. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Workers board over a store front in preparation for Hurricane Newton, in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, Monday Sept. 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Workers board over a store front in preparation for Hurricane Newton, in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, Monday Sept. 5, 2016. . (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
A man recovers belongings after the passing of Hurricane Newton in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, Tuesday Sept. 6, 2016. . (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

Hurricane Newton has shattered windows, downed trees and knocked out power in parts of the twin Mexican resorts of Los Cabos, but residents were spared the kind of extensive damage seen two years ago when they were hit by a stronger storm.

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A shrimp boat capsized in rough seas in the Gulf of California, killing two people and leaving three others missing, authorities said. The boat had set out from the port of Ensenada and was bound for Mazatlan.

Newton made landfall at the southern tip of Mexico's Baja California peninsula in the morning as a Category 1 hurricane with winds of 90mph, pelting the area with torrential rain as residents hunkered down in their homes and tourists huddled in hotels.

Palm trees were toppled along Cabo San Lucas's coastal boulevard and some windows were broken, but there was calm in the city as firefighters cleaned waste from the streets during the day.

Tourists play at a beach in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo
Tourists play at a beach in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo

"There are only minor damages - fallen branches, some fallen banners, some cables. In general, no victims," army Colonel Enrique Rangel said.

After passing over the resort area, Newton moved north up the interior of the peninsula and was expected to move over the gulf, which is also known as the Sea of Cortez. It was moving north-north-west at around 18mph with maximum sustained winds of 75mph.

Tourists have a beer at a bar using sand bags to protect from floodwaters in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo
Tourists have a beer at a bar using sand bags to protect from floodwaters in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo

The US National Hurricane Centre said the storm would make landfall in Sonora state still a hurricane. Newton could reach the US border as a tropical storm at noon on Wednesday, and drop 1in to 3in of rain over parts of Arizona and New Mexico through Thursday, threatening flash floods and landslides, forecasters said.

About 14,000 tourists remained in Los Cabos as the storm approached, tourism officials said, and visitors began venturing out after Newton passed.

Tourists walk past a debris-filled area in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo
Tourists walk past a debris-filled area in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo

In 2014, Los Cabos suffered heavy damage to homes, shops and hotels when it was hammered by Hurricane Odile, which hit land as a Category 3 storm.

Firefighters cut the trunk of a fallen tree in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo
Firefighters cut the trunk of a fallen tree in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo
Residents of an impoverished neighbourhood raise a power line damaged in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo
Residents of an impoverished neighbourhood raise a power line damaged in the aftermath of Hurricane Newton in Los Cabos, Mexico, September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Fernando Castillo

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