Thursday 19 October 2017

Japan's Kobe Steel reports wider manipulation of metals data as scandal deepens

The Japanese government is urging steelmaker Kobe Steel to clarify the extent of manipulation of data on steel, aluminium and other metals used in a wide range of products (Kyodo News via AP)
The Japanese government is urging steelmaker Kobe Steel to clarify the extent of manipulation of data on steel, aluminium and other metals used in a wide range of products (Kyodo News via AP)

Steel maker Kobe Steel has apologised after finding problems dating back to 2011 including faked inspections data for metals used in many products, including cars, bullet trains, aircraft and appliances.

The Japanese government has asked the company to provide more information about the products supplied to more than 200 customers, reportedly including some of the country's biggest manufacturers, including defence contractor Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and a number of automakers.

It was unclear if the total of 40,900 tons of products involved included shipments to other countries.

"We have confirmed that aluminium from Kobe Steel is used in the hoods and doors of some of our vehicles," Nissan said in an email. "As hoods are related to pedestrian safety, we are working to quickly assess any potential impact on vehicle functionality."

Toyota also confirmed that the material has been used in hoods and rear doors of some of its vehicles.

"Putting the utmost priority on the safety of our customers, we are rapidly working to identify which vehicle models might be subject to this situation and what components were used, as well as what effect there might be on individual vehicles," Toyota said in a statement.

Aircraft maker Boeing said it, too, is looking into the problem but had no reason to believe it was a safety concern.

"Boeing has been working closely and continuously with our suppliers since being notified of the issue to ensure timely and appropriate action, including comprehensive inspections and analysis throughout our supply chain," the company said in an email.

Kobe Steel said it discovered the violations during internal inspections and "emergency quality audits".

The company said it was contacting its customers and working to verify the safety of the products it supplied.

It has set up a committee headed by its president to investigate quality issues and hired an outside law firm to conduct a probe into the misconduct.

"Verification and inspection to date have not recognised specific problems casting doubts on the safety of the nonconforming products," it said.

Kobe Steel's president, Hiroya Kawasaki, issued a formal apology, lamenting that "trust in our company has dropped to zero".

He promised a senior trade ministry official that the company, Japan's third-largest steelmaker, would provide results of safety inspections within two weeks and a report on the cause of the problem within a month.

Akihiro Tada, director of the ministry's Manufacturing Industries Bureau, urged the company to move quickly in resolving the problems, which are thought to have affected many of the country's largest manufacturers.

The company said in a statement late on Wednesday that it had uncovered manipulation of data on steel powder used in metallurgy and also on high-tech materials used to create films used in computer chips. The government has urged Kobe Steel to clarify the extent of the misconduct.

The latest discovery was of falsification of data on 140 tons of steel powder supplied to one customer between April 2016 and March 2017.

Another case involved 6,611 items of materials shipped to 70 customers beginning in November 2011. Kobe Steel said it had failed to carry out tests it had agreed to conduct, and improperly "rewrote" inspection data.

But it said most of those materials, used to deposit thin films from various materials onto components such as computer chips, were re-inspected and are thought to have met customers' specifications.

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