Tuesday 26 September 2017

Indians protest at gay sex ruling

Indian gay rights activists hold placards during a protest against a Supreme Court verdict that upheld section 377 of the Indian Penal Code that criminalizes homosexuality in New Delhi, India
Indian gay rights activists hold placards during a protest against a Supreme Court verdict that upheld section 377 of the Indian Penal Code that criminalizes homosexuality in New Delhi, India
Indian gay rights activists hold placards as they protest Supreme Court's ruling criminalizing gay sex in Kolkata, India,

Hundreds of gay rights activists have gathered in the Indian capital to protest against a decision by India's top court to uphold a law that criminalises gay sex.

India's supreme court last week reversed a landmark 2009 lower court order that had decriminalised gay sex. The country's gay community is demanding that the government take immediate action to remove the colonial-era law banning same-sex relations.

Protesters in New Delhi wore black arm bands and waved rainbow-coloured flags and banners. Some people wore masks and wigs to protect their identity. They said the supreme court's ruling had evoked anger and dismay across the country.

Similar protests were organised in several Indian cities, with groups of gay and human rights activists urging a rollback of the court's decision.

Gay rights activists shout slogans during a protest against the verdict by the Supreme Court in Mumbai December 15, 2013. India's Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated a ban on gay sex in the world's largest democracy, following a four-year period of decriminalisation that had helped bring homosexuality into the open in the socially conservative country. In 2009 the Delhi High Court ruled unconstitutional a section of the penal code dating back to 1860 that prohibits
Gay rights activists shout slogans during a protest against the verdict by the Supreme Court in Mumbai December 15, 2013. India's Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated a ban on gay sex in the world's largest democracy, following a four-year period of decriminalisation that had helped bring homosexuality into the open in the socially conservative country. In 2009 the Delhi High Court ruled unconstitutional a section of the penal code dating back to 1860 that prohibits "carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman or animal" and lifted the ban for consenting adults. The Supreme Court threw out that decision, saying only parliament could change Section 377 of the penal code, widely interpreted to refer to homosexual sex. Violation of the law can be punished with up to 10 years in jail. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: LAW SOCIETY)
Indian gay rights activists hold placards during a protest against a Supreme Court verdict that upheld section 377 of the Indian Penal Code that criminalizes homosexuality in New Delhi, India, Sunday, Dec. 15, 2013. Hundreds of gay rights activists gathered in India's capital and other cities across the country on Sunday to protest a decision by India's top court to uphold a law that criminalizes gay sex. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal)
A gay rights activist wears a rainbow scarf during a protest against a verdict by the Supreme Court in New Delhi December 15, 2013. India's Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated a ban on gay sex in the world's largest democracy, following a four-year period of decriminalisation that had helped bring homosexuality into the open in the socially conservative country. In 2009 the Delhi High Court ruled unconstitutional a section of the penal code dating back to 1860 that prohibits "carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman or animal" and lifted the ban for consenting adults. The Supreme Court threw out that decision, saying only parliament could change Section 377 of the penal code, widely interpreted to refer to homosexual sex. Violation of the law can be punished with up to 10 years in jail. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A gay rights activist attends a protest against a verdict by the Supreme Court in New Delhi December 15, 2013. India's Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated a ban on gay sex in the world's largest democracy, following a four-year period of decriminalisation that had helped bring homosexuality into the open in the socially conservative country. In 2009 the Delhi High Court ruled unconstitutional a section of the penal code dating back to 1860 that prohibits "carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman or animal" and lifted the ban for consenting adults. The Supreme Court threw out that decision, saying only parliament could change Section 377 of the penal code, widely interpreted to refer to homosexual sex. Violation of the law can be punished with up to 10 years in jail. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
REFILE - REMOVING SECOND SENTENCE OF CAPTION Gay rights activists hold placards as they shout slogans during a protest against a verdict by the Supreme Court in New Delhi December 15, 2013. India's Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated a ban on gay sex in the world's largest democracy, following a four-year period of decriminalisation that had helped bring homosexuality into the open in the socially conservative country. In 2009 the Delhi High Court ruled unconstitutional a section of the penal code dating back to 1860 that prohibits "carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman or animal" and lifted the ban for consenting adults. The Supreme Court threw out that decision, saying only parliament could change Section 377 of the penal code, widely interpreted to refer to homosexual sex. Violation of the law can be punished with up to 10 years in jail. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
Gay rights activists hold placards during a protest against a verdict by the Supreme Court in New Delhi December 15, 2013. A gay rights activist takes a photograph of herself using her mobile phone during a protest against a verdict by the Supreme Court in New Delhi on December 11, 2013. India's Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated a ban on gay sex in the world's largest democracy, following a four-year period of decriminalisation that had helped bring homosexuality into the open in the socially conservative country. In 2009 the Delhi High Court ruled unconstitutional a section of the penal code dating back to 1860 that prohibits "carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman or animal" and lifted the ban for consenting adults. The Supreme Court threw out that decision, saying only parliament could change Section 377 of the penal code, widely interpreted to refer to homosexual sex. Violation of the law can be punished with up to 10 years in jail. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A gay rights activist holds a rainbow flag during a protest against the verdict by the Supreme Court in Mumbai December 15, 2013. India's Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated a ban on gay sex in the world's largest democracy, following a four-year period of decriminalisation that had helped bring homosexuality into the open in the socially conservative country. In 2009 the Delhi High Court ruled unconstitutional a section of the penal code dating back to 1860 that prohibits "carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman or animal" and lifted the ban for consenting adults. The Supreme Court threw out that decision, saying only parliament could change Section 377 of the penal code, widely interpreted to refer to homosexual sex. Violation of the law can be punished with up to 10 years in jail. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: LAW SOCIETY)
A gay rights activist holds a rainbow flag during a protest against a verdict by the Supreme Court in New Delhi December 15, 2013. A gay rights activist takes a photograph of herself using her mobile phone during a protest against a verdict by the Supreme Court in New Delhi December 11, 2013. India's Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated a ban on gay sex in the world's largest democracy, following a four-year period of decriminalisation that had helped bring homosexuality into the open in the socially conservative country. In 2009 the Delhi High Court ruled unconstitutional a section of the penal code dating back to 1860 that prohibits "carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman or animal" and lifted the ban for consenting adults. The Supreme Court threw out that decision, saying only parliament could change Section 377 of the penal code, widely interpreted to refer to homosexual sex. Violation of the law can be punished with up to 10 years in jail. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi (INDIA - Tags: CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
Gay rights activists hold a rainbow flag during a protest against the verdict by the Supreme Court in Mumbai December 15, 2013. India's Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated a ban on gay sex in the world's largest democracy, following a four-year period of decriminalisation that had helped bring homosexuality into the open in the socially conservative country. In 2009 the Delhi High Court ruled unconstitutional a section of the penal code dating back to 1860 that prohibits "carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman or animal" and lifted the ban for consenting adults. The Supreme Court threw out that decision, saying only parliament could change Section 377 of the penal code, widely interpreted to refer to homosexual sex. Violation of the law can be punished with up to 10 years in jail. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: LAW SOCIETY)
A gay rights activist holds a banner during a protest against the verdict by the Supreme Court in Mumbai December 15, 2013. India's Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated a ban on gay sex in the world's largest democracy, following a four-year period of decriminalisation that had helped bring homosexuality into the open in the socially conservative country. In 2009 the Delhi High Court ruled unconstitutional a section of the penal code dating back to 1860 that prohibits "carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman or animal" and lifted the ban for consenting adults. The Supreme Court threw out that decision, saying only parliament could change Section 377 of the penal code, widely interpreted to refer to homosexual sex. Violation of the law can be punished with up to 10 years in jail. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)
Gay rights activists shout slogans during a protest against the verdict by the Supreme Court in Mumbai December 15, 2013. India's Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated a ban on gay sex in the world's largest democracy, following a four-year period of decriminalisation that had helped bring homosexuality into the open in the socially conservative country. In 2009 the Delhi High Court ruled unconstitutional a section of the penal code dating back to 1860 that prohibits "carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman or animal" and lifted the ban for consenting adults. The Supreme Court threw out that decision, saying only parliament could change Section 377 of the penal code, widely interpreted to refer to homosexual sex. Violation of the law can be punished with up to 10 years in jail. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: LAW SOCIETY)
Gay rights activists shout slogans during a protest against the verdict by the Supreme Court in Mumbai December 15, 2013. India's Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated a ban on gay sex in the world's largest democracy, following a four-year period of decriminalisation that had helped bring homosexuality into the open in the socially conservative country. In 2009 the Delhi High Court ruled unconstitutional a section of the penal code dating back to 1860 that prohibits "carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman or animal" and lifted the ban for consenting adults. The Supreme Court threw out that decision, saying only parliament could change Section 377 of the penal code, widely interpreted to refer to homosexual sex. Violation of the law can be punished with up to 10 years in jail. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui (INDIA - Tags: CRIME LAW SOCIETY)

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