Saturday 29 April 2017

Woman who supplied gas for friend cleared of assisting her suicide

Milly Caller, who has been cleared of helping her friend Emma Crossman to kill herself. Photo: Chris Radburn/PA Wire
Milly Caller, who has been cleared of helping her friend Emma Crossman to kill herself. Photo: Chris Radburn/PA Wire

By Dave Higgens

The family of a 22-year-old woman cleared of helping her friend to kill herself today said she did not deserve to be prosecuted.

Milly Caller was found not guilty of encouraging or assisting the suicide of Emma Crossman, who was found dead in Sleaford, Lincolnshire, in January last year.

The jury found Miss Caller not guilty at Lincoln Crown Court after hearing six days of evidence, including from Miss Caller, who said she did not think her friend would take her own life.

Miss Caller did not show any emotion as the jury foreman read out the verdict.

Her family and friends were in tears in the public gallery and, after Miss Caller was released from the dock, she was embraced by her supporters in the court.

Outside, her family said she should never have been put in this position.

Her sister, Fiona, said: "She hasn't got a nasty bone in her body. She's the nicest person you would ever meet.

"She doesn't deserve any of this."

Miss Caller was alleged by the prosecution to have been "obsessed and infatuated" by Miss Crossman, 21, at the time of her death.

Opening the case for the prosecution last week, Mark McKone told the jury there was no dispute that the defendant supplied a gas that her friend used to help kill herself.

He said the facts of the case were not disputed but Miss Caller was pleading not guilty on the basis she did not think Miss Crossman would actually kill herself.

The court heard how Miss Crossman had a history of depression, self-harm and tablet overdoses.

He said she was particularly badly affected by relationship breakdowns and had split up with her partner, Adrian Kemp, 56, a month or so before her death.

The jury came back with the verdict just moments after they had been given a majority direction by the judge.

They had been deliberating for about four-and-a-half hours.

Press Association

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in World News