Tuesday 6 December 2016

'We can't believe terror has come to Munich', says Irish barman caught up in lockdown

Martin Grant

Published 23/07/2016 | 09:34

Patrick O'Connor
Patrick O'Connor

AN Irish barman in Munich was caught up in the lockdown after yesterday's deadly gun attack.

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Patrick O'Connor, from Arklow, Co Wicklow, said people were completely shocked after at least nine were killed in the shopping centre shooting.

The father-of-one, who manages Kennedy's Irish Bar and Restaurant, said the pub was in lockdown with up to 80 customers inside.

There were also unconfirmed reports of a shooting 400 metres from Kennedy's.

"We closed the restaurant after we heard about the shooting," Mr O'Connor told the Herald.

Scared

"We've had customers and staff members breaking down. They can't believe that terror has come to Munich.

"A lot of people are quite tense and are on edge. There's no public transport for people to go anywhere and taxi drivers have been told not to pick up anybody."

He added that his wife and three-year-old daughter were eating in Kennedy's and decided to leave around the same time shots were fired.

He tried to contact them, but started to panic when the mobile network went down.

"For the very first time in my life I actually felt scared," he said. "I was shook up until I got in contact with them and they are ok.

"People are just stunned. It was a usual busy Friday evening and the weather was really nice. We had a lot of people outside on our terrace."

Mr O'Connor said the city was an "obvious target" because nobody believed it could happen.

"I've been living here for 21 years and I feel very safe in this fantastic city," he said.

"Five years ago I wouldn't have batted an eyelid to a possible attack.

"I've got so many phone calls from relatives in Ireland. People are just on edge."

A spokesman for the Department of Foreign Affairs said it was monitoring the situation, but had no reports of any Irish citizens being caught up in the shooting.

The embassy said that anybody concerned about Irish citizens should call 01 408 2000.

Reuters

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