Monday 25 September 2017

US say there is no evidence to suggest attacks in Tunisia, France and Kuwait were coordinated

Tunisian police attempt to control the crowd while surrounding a man suspected to be involved in opening fire on tourists at a beachside hotel in Sousse
Tunisian police attempt to control the crowd while surrounding a man suspected to be involved in opening fire on tourists at a beachside hotel in Sousse
In this screengrab taken from video provided by Tunisia TV1, injured people are treated on a Tunisian beach (Tunisia TV1 via AP)
A general view shows items belonging to tourists at the swimming pool at the Thalasso & Spa hotel in the resort town of Sousse, a popular tourist destination 140 kilometres (90 miles) south of the Tunisian capital, on June 26, 2015, following a shooting attack. At least 27 people, including foreigners, were killed in a mass shooting at a Tunisian beach resort packed with holidaymakers, in the North African country's worst attack in recent history. AFP PHOTO / FETHI BELAIDFETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images
Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

The US State Department said there was no evidence so far that today's terrorist attacks in France, Tunisia and Kuwait were coordinated.

State Department spokesman John Kirby said the attacks were still being investigated but there was "no indication on a tactical level they were coordinated."

"Obviously, clearly, they were all terrorist attacks," Kirby said at a news briefing.

Read more here: Irishwoman killed in terror attack in Tunisia 

Scene of attack in Tunisia. Photo: Twitter/ MouradTeyeb
Scene of attack in Tunisia. Photo: Twitter/ MouradTeyeb

Suspected Islamic militants on Friday killed at least 37 people at a Tunisian seaside resort and 25 worshippers at a Shi'ite Muslim mosque in Kuwait, and decapitated a man at a U.S. gas company in France.

The attacks occurred during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan.

Islamic State had urged its followers on Tuesday to step up attacks during the Ramadan fasting month against Christians, Shi'ites and Sunni Muslims fighting with a U.S.-led coalition against the ultra-hardline jihadist group.

"I don't believe investigators are at a level now that they know precisely what motivated each one of these and the degree to which Ramadan itself was a factor," Kirby said. "It's just too soon to tell right now."

Reuters

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