Tuesday 6 December 2016

UK Election 2015: After six weeks of campaigning it is finally election day

Published 07/05/2015 | 17:43

A Polling Station sign on a gate in Collieston, Aberdeenshire as Britain goes to the ballot box today in the most uncertain General Election for decades, with no party on course to emerge a clear winner. Photo: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire
A Polling Station sign on a gate in Collieston, Aberdeenshire as Britain goes to the ballot box today in the most uncertain General Election for decades, with no party on course to emerge a clear winner. Photo: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire

After six weeks of campaigning it is finally election day, with polling booths opening at 7am.

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As the campaign drew to a close, party leaders sought to put their message before voters one final time.

David Cameron dismissed the idea he could have done more to win the election, insisting he had engaged with "real people" and delivered a "positive message".

The Prime Minister said the Tories had focused on the "things that matter" - the economy and leadership - and made "big bold" policy offers, adding that in contrast, Ed Miliband's efforts had been "desperately staid" and "antiseptic".

Just hours before the polls opened, the Labour leader warned voters they risk turning five years of Conservative rule into a decade-long reign that favours the privileged if they fail to turn out for Labour.

Issuing a final rallying call, the opposition leader will say there are just "hours left to change the direction of our country".

Nick Clegg delivered his final pitch in John O'Groats at the end of a 1,000-mile, 48-hour battlebus odyssey that began in Lands End, saying the UK public face "the biggest political decision of their lives."

The Liberal Democrat leader said his party could provide stability, but warned that Labour and the Conservatives were in danger of "sleepwalking" to a "messy" minority government.

And Ukip leader Nigel Farage said support for his party was "rock solid" and predicted it would outperform the opinion polls.

Speaking at a rally in Broadstairs, Kent, Mr Farage - who has said he will quit as Ukip leader if he fails to be elected as MP for South Thanet - said election day was "the biggest day in my political career".

Mr Cameron has managed to surge ahead of the other leaders in one respect though - passing one million followers on Twitter.

His following dwarfs those of Mr Miliband, with 475,000, Mr Clegg on 242,000 and Mr Farage on 225,000. The SNP's Nicola Sturgeon trails on 193,000.

Polls have opened to millions of voters in the most uncertain General Election for decades, with no party on course to emerge a clear winner.

Press Association

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