Thursday 8 December 2016

David Cameron rules out Scottish referendum - pays tribute to former Labour leader Ed Miliband

Published 08/05/2015 | 13:46

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks outside Number 10 Downing Street to announce he will form a new majority goverment, in London, Britain May 8, 2015.
REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks outside Number 10 Downing Street to announce he will form a new majority goverment, in London, Britain May 8, 2015. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron walks towards the door of 10 Downing Street with his wife Samantha after announcing he will form a new majority goverment in London, Britain May 8, 2015. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks outside Number 10 Downing Street to announce he will form a new majority goverment, in London, Britain May 8, 2015. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron walks towards the door of 10 Downing Street with his wife Samantha after announcing he will form a new majority goverment in London, Britain May 8, 2015. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks outside Number 10 Downing Street to announce he will form a new majority goverment in London, Britain May 8, 2015. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks outside Number 10 Downing Street to announce he will form a new majority goverment, in London, Britain May 8, 2015. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks outside Number 10 Downing Street to announce he will form a new majority goverment, in London, Britain May 8, 2015. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron and his wife Samantha pose as they return to Number 10 Downing Street after meeting with Queen Elizabeth at Buckingham Palace in London, Britain May 8, 2015. REUTERS/Phil Noble
Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks outside Number 10 Downing Street to announce he will form a new majority goverment in London, Britain May 8, 2015 REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

Re-elected Prime Minister David Cameron has effectively ruled out a second referendum on independence for Scotland.

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In his speech outside Downing Street, Mr Cameron said he would be proud to lead a majority Conservative government after his party won the general election.

During his brief speech to assembled members of the media, Mr Cameron made a number of pointed references to Scotland, promising more devolution for governments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

"We must ensure we bring our country together - one nation, one united kingdom," he said.

His comments came as the Scottish National Party, led by Nicola Sturgeon, swept the board in Scotland, picking up 56 out of 58 seats.

Mr Cameron said his government recognised the importance of the bringing together of different nations of the UK.

He pointed that his government facilitated the referendum for independence in Scotland during the last term, in which 56pc said they wished to remain within the UK.

Continuing, he said devolution as agreed by all parties would continue for Wales, Scotland Northern Ireland.

Mr Cameron said he would implement "as fast as I can" the devolution agreed for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

These "different nations" will have their own government as well as UK government. The government of these nations will have more power and more responsibilities, he said.

Pointing to Scotland again, he said the Scottish parliament would have one of the most powerful governments with powers over taxation.

Mr Cameron said: "I truly believe we are on the brink of something very special in this country."

Speaking about economic recovery, the prime minister said he wanted the recovery to reach all parts of the country.

He said his government will be working to ensure that all people will have the opportunity to make something of their lives no matter where they are from through education, training and jobs.

He also paid tribute to former Labour leader and his rival Ed Miliband.

"Ed Miliband rang me this morning to wish me luck in the new government.

"It was a typically generous gesture from someone who is in the public service for all the right reasons," he said.

Mr Cameron made no mention of Nick Clegg, the former deputy prime minister and leader of the Liberal Democrats who were in coalition with the Conservatives in the last term. The party have lost 50 seats in this election, dropping down to just eight seats. Mr Clegg, Mr Miliband and Nigel Farage of Ukip have all resigned in the last few hours following the disastrous showing in the elections.

Meanwhile, SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon said her party will continue to have a "loud" voice in Westminster.

She said she was disappointed Labour failed to get more seats in the election.

She has yet to congratulate Mr Cameron on his success but was planning to do so later today, she told reporters.

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