Saturday 1 October 2016

Borris wins with huge majority

By David Mercer

Published 08/05/2015 | 06:06

Mayor of London and prospective Conservative candidate for Uxbridge and South Ruislip, Boris Johnson, after winning the seat during the General Election count at Brunel University, London. Photo: Andrew Matthews/PA Wire
Mayor of London and prospective Conservative candidate for Uxbridge and South Ruislip, Boris Johnson, after winning the seat during the General Election count at Brunel University, London. Photo: Andrew Matthews/PA Wire

Boris Johnson has succeeded in his bid for a Commons comeback after winning the seat for Uxbridge and South Ruislip in west London after a seven-year absence.

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For the next year he will be combining his duties in the Commons with his high-profile role as Mayor of London, having previously vowed to continue with the job until his term ends next year.

The senior Tory politician is, of course, no stranger to Parliament as he was MP for Henley for seven years until he left in 2008 to take up the reins at the capital's City Hall.

The London mayor secured the safe Conservative seat with a majority of more than 10,000 votes.

He previously served as MP for Henley for seven years before leaving to take up the City Hall reins in 2008.

Mr Johnson told the BBC: "It's been a long and exciting evening. I'm excited by some of the results coming through here in London.

"Sad about others, but overall it's been an amazing night for the Conservatives when you consider where we were and what the polls were saying only a few hours ago.

"It's a remarkable turnaround."

On Scotland, he added: "There has to be some kind of federal offer. Everybody needs to take a deep breath and think about how we want the UK to progress.

"I think even most people in the SNP, probably in their heart of hearts, most people who voted SNP tonight, do not want to throw away absolutely everything."

Mr Johnson, widely tipped to become the next Tory leader after David Cameron, nodded and shook hands with a rival candidate after the results were announced.

He was joined by his wife Marina Wheeler for the count at Brunel University in Uxbridge, where the results were announced at around 4.30am.

Speaking after the result, Mr Johnson said: "I think it's been a fantastic campaign in London and we're seeing some extraordinary results come in. I think we can be very, very proud of what we've achieved.

"I want to thank Marina who has thrown herself into this campaign with unprecedented enthusiasm, in spite of the fact that today, as I've just remembered, is our wedding anniversary. She thought I'd forgotten."

Mr Johnson also paid tribute to former deputy chief whip Sir John Randall, who stepped down as MP for the constituency, describing him as a "wonderful servant of Parliament, this country and of this constituency."

"My ambition is to follow in his footsteps," he said.

Mr Johnson, 50, has insisted he will see out his full term as mayor, which runs to next year.

With the Conservatives on course to secure the most seats in Parliament, Mr Johnson said: "The people of Britain, after a long and exhausting campaign, have finally spoken. I don't think we need any fancy constitutional expert to tell us what they were trying to say.

"I think they have decisively rejected any attempt to take this country back to the 1970s, decisively rejected old-fashioned and outdated politics of division, and it is clear to me the people of this country want us to go forward with sensible, moderate policies that this Conservative Party has produced over the last five years and that have led to a sustained economic recovery.

"I think the people of this country want to go forward with that long-term economic plan for the benefit of everybody in this constituency and across the entire country.

"To that end, I renew my pledge to work absolutely flat-out.

"I believe we have a lot to do, folks, but it is clear to me the people of this country have voted for a programme of economic common sense to take Britain forward."

Turnout for the vote was 63.6%, up from 60.99% in 2010.

Mr Johnson won 22,511 votes, ahead of Labour's Chris Summers, a BBC journalist, with 11,816. Ukip candidate Jack Duffin, 23, was third with 6,346, ahead of Liberal Democrat Michael Francis Cox with 2,215.

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