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Wednesday 3 September 2014

'Smart glasses' for blind get first public sight tests

John von Radowitz

Published 18/06/2014 | 02:30

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Dr Stephen Hicks, of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences at Oxford University, testing 'smart glasses' that provide a new set of eyes for the visually impaired. PA
Dr Stephen Hicks, of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences at Oxford University, testing 'smart glasses' that provide a new set of eyes for the visually impaired. PA
Dr Stephen Hicks, of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences at Oxford University, testing 'smart glasses' that provide a new set of eyes for the visually impaired. PA
Dr Stephen Hicks, of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences at Oxford University, testing 'smart glasses' that provide a new set of eyes for the visually impaired. PA
Dr Stephen Hicks, of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences at Oxford University, testing 'smart glasses' that provide a new set of eyes for the visually impaired. PA
Dr Stephen Hicks, of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences at Oxford University, testing 'smart glasses' that provide a new set of eyes for the visually impaired. PA

'SMART glasses' that provide a new set of eyes for the visually impaired are being tested in public for the first time.

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The devices, which use a pair of video cameras to enhance residual vision, have the potential to transform the lives of thousands of partially blind people.

By helping to make the most of existing sight and delivering an all-important sense of depth, they can prevent users colliding with objects such as lampposts or tripping over kerbs and steps.

The glasses are being trialled by 30 visually impaired volunteers at testing venues in Oxford and Cambridge, England, where they will navigate through specially constructed obstacle courses.

At the same time, a handful of users are giving the devices a 'real life' airing in public, mingling with shoppers and tourists in the centre of Oxford.

Dr Stephen Hicks of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences at Oxford University, who led development of the glasses, said: "The idea of the smart glasses is to give people with poor vision an aid that boosts their awareness of what's around them – allowing greater freedom, independence and confidence to get about, and a much improved quality of life.

"We eventually want to have a product that will look like a regular pair of glasses and cost no more than a few hundred pounds – about the same as a smartphone."

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