Saturday 3 December 2016

Second Germanwings black box confirms co-pilot deliberately crashed plane

Published 03/04/2015 | 10:43

Shortly after Andreas Lubitz, the 27-year-old co-pilot of Germanwings Flight 9525, deliberately crashed the plane killing 150 people, it emerged he had suffered from depression (AP Photo/Michael Mueller)
Shortly after Andreas Lubitz, the 27-year-old co-pilot of Germanwings Flight 9525, deliberately crashed the plane killing 150 people, it emerged he had suffered from depression (AP Photo/Michael Mueller)
A French rescue worker inspects the remains of the Germanwings Airbus A320 at the site of the crash, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps in this March 29, 2015, file photo. Americans fear pilots purposely crashing an airliner as much as they are afraid of a hijacking, and over a quarter are more scared of flying than they were before a copilot crashed a jet in France last week, killing 150 people, a Reuters/Ipsos poll found. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes/Files
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (right) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps. Reuters/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr and CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann lay a wreath of flowers at a stone slab in Le Vernet, France (AP)
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann carry flowers as they pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015.REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann carry flowers as they pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann and Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr, left, arrive with a wreath of flowers at a stone slab erected as a monument in memory of the victims, near the site of the Germanwings jet crash, in Le Vernet, France, Wednesday, April 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (L) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann they pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (L) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (C) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann (2ndL) speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann (L) arrive to attend a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann, centre, shakes hands with French gendarmes near the site of the Germanwings jet crash, in Le Vernet, France, Wednesday, April 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann and Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr, left, lay a wreath of flowers at a stone slab erected as a monument in memory of the victims, near the site of the Germanwings jet crash, in Le Vernet, France, Wednesday, April 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (L) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann carry flowers as they pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann and Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr, left, arrive with a wreath of flowers at a stone slab erected as a monument, set up in memory of the victims in the area where the Germanwings jetliner crashed in the French Alps, in Le Vernet, France, Wednesday, April 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)

France BEA's aviation investigators said today a second black box recovered from the Germanwings crash site indicated that the co-pilot deliberately crashed the airplane.

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The flight data recorder revealed that co-pilot Andreas Lubitz accelerated the engines as they descended into the Alps, crashing the plane deliberately.

"A first reading shows that the pilot in the cockpit used the automatic pilot to put the airplane on a descent towards an altitude of 100 feet," the BEA investigation office said in a statement.

"Then several times the pilot modified the automatic pilot settings to increase the speed of the airplane as it descended," it added.

Yesterday, Dusseldorf prosecutors said investigators found a tablet computer at co-pilot Andreas Lubitz's apartment in the city and were able to reconstruct his computer searches from March 16 to March 23.

Based on information from the cockpit voice recorder, Investigators believe the 27-year-old Lubitz locked his captain out of the A320's cockpit on March 24 and deliberately crashed the plane, killing everyone on board.

Prosecutors' spokesman Ralf Herrenbrueck said in a statement that Lubitz's search terms included medical treatment and suicide methods.

On at least one day, the co-pilot looked at search terms involving cockpit doors and their security methods.

"(He) concerned himself on one hand with medical treatment methods, on the other hand with types and ways of going about a suicide," Mr Herrenbrueck said. "In addition, on at least one day (Lubitz) concerned himself with search terms about cockpit doors and their security precautions."

German prosecutors said personal correspondence and search terms on the tablet, whose browser memory had not been erased, "support the conclusion that the machine was used by the co-pilot in the relevant period".

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