Tuesday 27 September 2016

Massive queues in Paris as people line up to donate blood

Published 14/11/2015 | 14:02

People queue to give blood at a makeshift centre near to the Le Petit Cambodge, Paris, one of the venues for the attacks in the French capital which are feared to have killed around 127 people.
People queue to give blood at a makeshift centre near to the Le Petit Cambodge, Paris, one of the venues for the attacks in the French capital which are feared to have killed around 127 people.
People line up to give blood at the St Louis hospital across the street from the Petit Cambodge restaurant in Paris Saturday Nov. 14, 2015, a day after over 120 people were killed in a series of shooting and explosions. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

Parisians are lining up for hours to give blood, and piling flowers and notes and spilling tears outside a music hall where scores of people were killed by rampaging suicide bombers.

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Though deeply shaken, many residents of the hip neighbourhood in eastern Paris tried to find a way to help about 200 people wounded in a string of attacks on Friday night on the concert hall, crowded cafes and a sports stadium.

Long lines of blood donors snaked out of the St Louis Hospital near the site of the bloodshed.

Near the Bataclan concert hall, people who lost loved ones - and many who did not - came to pay their respects. The attackers stormed the Bataclan the night of a concert by US band Eagles of Death Metal.

"For the angels of rock 'n' roll," read one note.

"For all the friends that I knew, and those I didn't know. For life," read another.

A community leader from Paris's working-class suburbs has said he fears a "tsunami of hatred" could await Muslims and residents of poor neighbourhoods after the attacks.

Nadir Kahia of the Banlieue Plus community association said its members are shocked and feel a sense of solidarity, "but we know ... some Muslims and poor neighbourhoods" will be subjected to hate speech.

Mr Kahia called for unity among French people and efforts to calm tensions.

Meanwhile, Parisians desperate to get in touch with family and friends missing since Friday night are taking to social media under the hashtag #rechercheparis - "Paris Search" in English - posting messages and photos.

Scores of people who were at the six targeted sites are still unaccounted for.

One post read: "Waleed is missing. We last contacted him at the match, Please share & contact me if u have any info. #rechercheParis."

Another said: "I've been looking for my cousin since last night... He's 25 and 1m75. He's called Younes. #rechercheParis."

The photos and messages are getting hundreds of retweets from users eager to help in the search for survivors.

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