Friday 30 September 2016

One of two suicide bombers in deadly Ankara attack 'was a woman'

Published 14/03/2016 | 07:14

Emergency services work at the explosion site in the busy center of Turkish capital, Ankara, Turkey, Sunday, March 13, 2016
Emergency services work at the explosion site in the busy center of Turkish capital, Ankara, Turkey, Sunday, March 13, 2016
People carry an injured person after an explosion in the busy center of Turkish capital, Ankara, Turkey, Sunday, March 13, 2016
An injured person is carried at the explosion site in the busy center of Turkish capital, Ankara, Turkey, Sunday, March 13, 2016

One of the two suicide bombers thought to be responsible for the Ankara attack in which 37 people were killed was a woman.

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Evidence shows that one of two suspected perpetrators of a car bomb attack which killed 37 people in the Turkish capital Ankara was a woman who joined the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) militant group in 2013, security officials said on Monday.

People carry an injured person after an explosion in the busy center of Turkish capital, Ankara, Turkey, Sunday, March 13, 2016
People carry an injured person after an explosion in the busy center of Turkish capital, Ankara, Turkey, Sunday, March 13, 2016

They identified the woman as having been born in 1992 and being from the eastern Turkish city of Kars.

Turkey's military has carried out air strikes against Kurdish rebel targets in northern Iraq hours after a deadly bombing in Ankara, the state-run news agency said.

An injured person is carried at the explosion site in the busy center of Turkish capital, Ankara, Turkey, Sunday, March 13, 2016
An injured person is carried at the explosion site in the busy center of Turkish capital, Ankara, Turkey, Sunday, March 13, 2016

The Anadolu Agency said nine F-16s and two F-4 jets raided 18 positions of the Kurdistan Workers' Party, or PKK in the northern Iraq, including the Qandil mountains where the group's leadership is based.

Meanwhile, Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan has vowed to bring terrorism "to its knees" following the suicide car bomb attack in the capital that killed at least 37 people and injured 125 others.

Mr Erdogan also said Turkey would use its right to self-defence to prevent future attacks and called for national unity.

"Our people should not worry, the struggle against terrorism will for certain end in success and terrorism will be brought to its knees," he said.

The death toll in a car bomb attack in the Turkish capital Ankara has risen to 37 people, Health Minister Mehmet Muezzinoglu said on Monday, adding that 71 people were still being treated in hospital.

Of those in hospital, 15 were in serious condition, he told reporters.

Sunday's bombing was the second such attack in the administrative heart of the city in under a month and two senior security officials told Reuters initial findings suggested the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) militant group was responsible.

Turkey's prime minister Ahmet Davutoglu has postponed a visit to Jordan following the deadly bombing in Ankara.

The car bomb targeted people milling near bus stops in the heart of Ankara, killing the two suspected bombers, one of whom was a woman, a senior government official said.

Read More: Car bomb kills 34 in new Turkey terror attack

Thirty victims were killed at the scene and four others died in hospital. Nineteen of the injured were said to be in a serious condition.

Police suspect Kurdish militants carried out the attack based on "initial indications", the government official added.

Interior minister Efkan Ala said Sunday's attack would not deter the country from its fight against terrorism.

British prime minister David Cameron said he was "appalled" by the atrocity, tweeting: "My thoughts are with all those affected."

US State Department spokesman John Kirby said: "We reaffirm our strong partnership with our Nato ally Turkey in combating the shared threat of terrorism."

Nato secretary general Jens Stoltenberg said: "There can be no justification of such heinous acts of violence."

Press Association

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