Thursday 29 September 2016

Lubitz told doctors he was on sick leave while he was still flying

Henry Samuel Paris

Published 03/04/2015 | 02:30

Andreas Lubitz, the rogue pilot who brought down a plane in the French Alps last week, lied to doctors by telling them he was on sick leave when he was still flying commercial airliners, according to German reports (AP Photo/Michael Mueller)
Andreas Lubitz, the rogue pilot who brought down a plane in the French Alps last week, lied to doctors by telling them he was on sick leave when he was still flying commercial airliners, according to German reports (AP Photo/Michael Mueller)

Andreas Lubitz, the rogue pilot who brought down a plane in the French Alps last week, lied to doctors by telling them he was on sick leave when he was still flying commercial airliners, according to German reports.

  • Go To

The 27-year-old who locked his captain out of their Germanwings Airbus A320 cockpit and slammed the plane into the Alps last Tuesday, killing 150, was on medication so strong that patients are advised not to drive a car, let alone fly a commercial plane, according to Bild, the German daily.

Side effects also include an increased risk of suicide.

Lubitz had sought medical attention to try and cure an eye condition, the paper reported.

Although he gave doctors information about his job as a pilot, and in some cases about his employer, he deliberately hid the fact that he was still working, Bild said, citing sources close to the investigation.

Documents also reportedly revealed that Lubitz recounted being involved in a car crash at the end of 2014 in which he suffered injuries when his airbag opened.

Since the accident, he had complained of trauma and impaired hearing and vision.

"He stated during medical treatment that, among other things, it often appeared dark around him," wrote Bild.

He underwent an MRI scan on his brain but no significant damage was found.

According to medical records, Lubitz stated that he was taking medicines to treat depression, anxiety disorders and panic attacks, the paper said, adding the drugs were an antidepressant and the tranquilliser Lorazepam.

Medical experts say it can also increase the risk of self-harm at the start of treatment.

The report came a day after Germanwings parent company Lufthansa confirmed that when Lubitz resumed pilot training in 2009 he provided the flight school with medical documents showing he had gone through a "previous episode of severe depression".

He was apparently more stable in recent years, but in the last few weeks had reportedly seen doctors three times for depression and an eye doctor over fears he was losing his sight. (© Daily Telegraph, London)

Telegraph.co.uk

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in World News