Wednesday 28 June 2017

Looney rules: EU bans claim that water can prevent dehydration

Picture posed. Thinkstock
Picture posed. Thinkstock

Victoria Ward and Nick Collins

BRUSSELS bureaucrats have been ridiculed after banning drink manufacturers from claiming that water can prevent dehydration.

EU officials concluded that, following a three-year investigation, there was no evidence to prove the previously undisputed fact.



Producers of bottled water are now forbidden by law from making the claim and will face a two-year jail sentence if they defy the edict.



Health guidelines state clearly that drinking water helps avoid dehydration, and that people should drink at least 1.2 litres per day.



German professors Dr Andreas Hahn and Dr Moritz Hagenmeyer, who advise food manufacturers on how to advertise their products, asked the European Commission if the claim could be made on labels.



They compiled what they assumed was an uncontroversial statement in order to test new laws which allow products to claim they can reduce the risk of disease, subject to EU approval.



They applied for the right to state that “regular consumption of significant amounts of water can reduce the risk of development of dehydration” as well as preventing a decrease in performance.



However, last February, the European Food Standards Authority (EFSA) refused to approve the statement.



A meeting of 21 scientists in Parma, Italy, concluded that reduced water content in the body was a symptom of dehydration and not something that drinking water could subsequently control.



Now the EFSA verdict has been turned into an EU directive which was issued on Wednesday.



EU regulations, which aim to uphold food standards across member states, are frequently criticised.



Rules banning bent bananas and curved cucumbers were scrapped in 2008 after causing international ridicule.



Prof Hahn, from the Institute for Food Science and Human Nutrition at Hanover Leibniz University, said the European Commission had made another mistake with its latest ruling.



“What is our reaction to the outcome? Let us put it this way: We are neither surprised nor delighted.



“The European Commission is wrong; it should have authorised the claim. That should be more than clear to anyone who has consumed water in the past, and who has not? We fear there is something wrong in the state of Europe.”



Prof Brian Ratcliffe, spokesman for the Nutrition Society, said dehydration was usually caused by a clinical condition and that one could remain adequately hydrated without drinking water.



He said: “The EU is saying that this does not reduce the risk of dehydration and that is correct.



“This claim is trying to imply that there is something special about bottled water which is not a reasonable claim.”

Telegraph.co.uk

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in World News