Friday 30 September 2016

Istanbul's Bosporus Bridge to be renamed July 15th Martyrs' Bridge in honour of civilians who died in coup attempt

Published 25/07/2016 | 21:51

Pro-government supporters protest on the road leading to Istanbul's iconic Bosporus Bridge, not seen, late Thursday, July 21, 2016
Pro-government supporters protest on the road leading to Istanbul's iconic Bosporus Bridge, not seen, late Thursday, July 21, 2016

Istanbul's Bosporus Bridge will be renamed July 15th Martyrs' Bridge in honour of civilians who died resisting Turkey's coup attempt, prime minister Binali Yildirim has said.

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The decision to rename the bridge across the Bosporus strait, which links Istanbul's Asian and European sides, was taken after a cabinet meeting.

Pro-government supporters protest on Istanbul's iconic Bosporus Bridge, late Thursday, July 21, 2016
Pro-government supporters protest on Istanbul's iconic Bosporus Bridge, late Thursday, July 21, 2016

Mr Yildirim also announced that monuments to the civilians killed during the attempted coup would be built in Ankara and Istanbul.

The July 15 uprising left about 290 people dead. It was put down by loyalist forces and masses of civilians who rushed to the streets, with several killed on the bridge.

The move was announced as authorities reportedly issued warrants for the detention of 42 journalists and detained 31 academics in a crackdown against people allegedly linked to a US-based Muslim cleric after the failed coup.

The state-run Anadolu news agency said the list of journalists wanted for questioning included prominent writer Nazli Ilicak, who has been critical of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Mr Ilicak has opposed the government clampdown on a movement led by Fethullah Gulen, the cleric accused by Turkey of directing the coup attempt. Mr Gulen has denied any involvement in the failed insurrection.

The government has declared a three-month state of emergency and detained more than 13,000 people in the military, judiciary and other institutions following the foiled coup.

Those rounded up include nearly 9,000 soldiers, 2,100 judges and prosecutors and 1,485 police, according to the president.

In addition, tens of thousands of workers have lost their jobs, suspected of possible ties to the coup plotters.

Mr Erdogan said the government has also closed and seized the assets of 15 universities, 934 other schools, 109 student dormitories, 19 unions, 35 medical institutions and more than 1,100 other associations and foundations.

Amnesty International said it has obtained evidence that detainees were subjected to ill-treatment, including beatings and torture.

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