Saturday 10 December 2016

Heston Blumenthal to cook testicles for Queen Elizabeth

Laura Roberts

Published 17/06/2010 | 15:12

Heston Blumenthal is pictured at the entrance to his restaurant the Fat Duck in Berkshire. Photo: Getty Images
Heston Blumenthal is pictured at the entrance to his restaurant the Fat Duck in Berkshire. Photo: Getty Images

Heston Blumenthal, the Michelin-starred chef, will serve Queen Elizabeth brain and testicles as part of an experimental private dinner.

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Blumenthal, who has built his reputation with dishes such as snail porridge, will cook for the monarch at Windsor Castle on Thursday evening.

He has already completed a trial run of the menu which has been tasted by Queen Elizabeth's chefs and declared a success, according to the Daily Mail.

The starter is composed to look like a bowl of fruit but is in fact made up of sweetbreads and assorted offal, including brain and testicles.

Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh will dine with twenty-six friends and family.

It is understood that she watched the chef, 44, demonstrate his "molecular" cooking techniques two years ago at the official reopening of the Royal Institution.

The Duke of Edinburgh was able to sample some nitrogen-enhanced apple and orange ginger granite ice cream but Queen Elizabeth, who is never seen eating in public, was unable to do so.

A royal staff party was even held at Blumenthal's award-winning restaurant The Fat Duck, in Bray, Berkshire.

Queen Elizabeth will be paying for Thursday evening herself since it is a private party being held during Royal Ascot week.

She is unlikely to be fazed by offal after being presented with a variety of exotic foods over the years.

Sweetbreads are made from the thymus glands or pancreas of young calves or lambs.

The evening's main course is to be baked salmon accompanied with glazed vegetables and followed by strawberry gateau with cream on the side.

Buckingham Palace declined to comment while Blumenthal's spokesman said he was unable to speak about any cooking for private clients.

Telegraph.co.uk

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