Thursday 8 December 2016

Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz was seeing 'astonishing' number of doctors

Published 06/04/2015 | 12:43

Shortly after Andreas Lubitz, the 27-year-old co-pilot of Germanwings Flight 9525, deliberately crashed the plane killing 150 people, it emerged he had suffered from depression (AP Photo/Michael Mueller)
Shortly after Andreas Lubitz, the 27-year-old co-pilot of Germanwings Flight 9525, deliberately crashed the plane killing 150 people, it emerged he had suffered from depression (AP Photo/Michael Mueller)
A French rescue worker inspects the remains of the Germanwings Airbus A320 at the site of the crash, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps in this March 29, 2015, file photo. Americans fear pilots purposely crashing an airliner as much as they are afraid of a hijacking, and over a quarter are more scared of flying than they were before a copilot crashed a jet in France last week, killing 150 people, a Reuters/Ipsos poll found. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes/Files
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (right) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps. Reuters/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr and CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann lay a wreath of flowers at a stone slab in Le Vernet, France (AP)
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann carry flowers as they pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015.REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann carry flowers as they pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann and Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr, left, arrive with a wreath of flowers at a stone slab erected as a monument in memory of the victims, near the site of the Germanwings jet crash, in Le Vernet, France, Wednesday, April 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (L) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann they pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (L) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (C) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann (2ndL) speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann (L) arrive to attend a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann, centre, shakes hands with French gendarmes near the site of the Germanwings jet crash, in Le Vernet, France, Wednesday, April 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann and Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr, left, lay a wreath of flowers at a stone slab erected as a monument in memory of the victims, near the site of the Germanwings jet crash, in Le Vernet, France, Wednesday, April 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (L) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann carry flowers as they pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann and Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr, left, arrive with a wreath of flowers at a stone slab erected as a monument, set up in memory of the victims in the area where the Germanwings jetliner crashed in the French Alps, in Le Vernet, France, Wednesday, April 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)

Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz was seeing an 'astonishing' number of doctors before he killed 150 people in a deliberate plane crash, a leaked medical report has revealed.

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According to Der Spiegel newspaper, the 27-year-old German was visiting at least five doctors, including psychiatric specialists and a neurologist.

“For a young man he consulted an astonishing number of doctors,” an investigator told the magazine, which has seen a report on Lubitz’s treatment.

Five separate medical practices have handed over their records on Lubitz to investigators since the co-pilot purposefully crashed the Germanwings Airbus A320 with 150 on board into the French Alps.

Lubitz was signed off work for a fortnight on the day of the crash for a yet-unknown reason. Investigators found ripped up letters at Lubitz's home, suggesting he was hiding his illness from his employers.

The German aviation authority claim they did not know about co-pilot Andreas Lubitz's medical background prior to the Germanwings crash, raising more questions over medical oversight of pilots.

Lubitz broke off his pilot training for several months in 2009, and on restarting informed the Lufthansa pilot training school by email he had overcome a period of severe depression.

Lufthansa, the parent company of Germanwings, has said he passed all medical and suitability tests upon restarting training.

The Luftfahrtbundesamt (LBA), the German authority which issues pilots' licences based on annual fit-to-fly certificates given by doctors and can impose restrictions on pilots, said it had "no information at all" prior to the crash about this period of depression.

According to European regulations, doctors should refer pilots with psychiatric conditions to the licensing authority. The regulations do not specify whether this also applies to pilots who have suffered from psychiatric conditions in the past.

"Lufthansa meets its duty to provide information to the LBA," the airline said.

The statement from the LBA comes a day after the European Commission said its aviation regulator EASA had found "issues" with Germany's aviation authority in a regular review of air safety enforcement.

The 'Wall Street Journal' said the EC told Berlin in November "to remedy the long-standing problems" - months before the Germanwings crash on March 24.

EU officials found the LBA had a lack of staff, which could have limited its ability to carry out checks on planes and crew

German prosecutors have said a computer found in Lubitz's home revealed internet searches on how to commit suicide as well as on cockpit doors and safety precautions related to them.

Yesterday, German newspaper 'Bild am Sonntag' said investigators had found Lubitz used the username "Skydevil" to log on to the computer and had recently made Internet searches on "bipolarity", "manic depression" as well as on "migraines", "impaired vision" and "acoustic trauma".

Additional reporting from The Telegraph

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