Monday 5 December 2016

Full horror of Alps crash revealed on phone video: claim

Justin Huggler in Berlin

Published 02/04/2015 | 02:30

A French rescue worker inspects the remains of the Germanwings Airbus A320 at the site of the crash, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps in this March 29, 2015, file photo. Americans fear pilots purposely crashing an airliner as much as they are afraid of a hijacking, and over a quarter are more scared of flying than they were before a copilot crashed a jet in France last week, killing 150 people, a Reuters/Ipsos poll found. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes/Files
A French rescue worker inspects the remains of the Germanwings Airbus A320 at the site of the crash, near Seyne-les-Alpes, French Alps in this March 29, 2015, file photo. Americans fear pilots purposely crashing an airliner as much as they are afraid of a hijacking, and over a quarter are more scared of flying than they were before a copilot crashed a jet in France last week, killing 150 people, a Reuters/Ipsos poll found. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes/Files
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (right) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps. Reuters/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr and CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann lay a wreath of flowers at a stone slab in Le Vernet, France (AP)
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann carry flowers as they pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015.REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann carry flowers as they pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann and Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr, left, arrive with a wreath of flowers at a stone slab erected as a monument in memory of the victims, near the site of the Germanwings jet crash, in Le Vernet, France, Wednesday, April 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (L) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann they pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (L) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (C) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann (2ndL) speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann (L) arrive to attend a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (R) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann speak during a news conference near the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann, centre, shakes hands with French gendarmes near the site of the Germanwings jet crash, in Le Vernet, France, Wednesday, April 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann and Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr, left, lay a wreath of flowers at a stone slab erected as a monument in memory of the victims, near the site of the Germanwings jet crash, in Le Vernet, France, Wednesday, April 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
Lufthansa Chief Executive Carsten Spohr (L) and Germanwings Managing Director Thomas Winkelmann carry flowers as they pay their respects at the memorial for the victims of the air disaster in the village of Le Vernet, near the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 in French Alps April 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier
CEO of Germanwings Thomas Winkelmann and Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr, left, arrive with a wreath of flowers at a stone slab erected as a monument, set up in memory of the victims in the area where the Germanwings jetliner crashed in the French Alps, in Le Vernet, France, Wednesday, April 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)

A video purportedly showing the final seconds inside the cabin of the ill-fated Germanwings airliner minutes before it crashed emerged, two European media said, although French police denied the claims to CNN.

  • Go To

One sequence reportedly shows a chaotic scene with passengers screaming "My God".

French magazine 'Paris Match' and German daily 'Bild' said the authenticity of the video filmed on a mobile phone is "unquestionable" and that it had been retrieved from the wreckage of the crash.

The phone had not survived the crash, but the memory card on which it was stored had, the two publications claimed.

The video allegedly shows passengers on board the flight clearly aware of what is happening to them. They can be heard screaming, and there are cries of "My God" in several different languages. There are also three loud metallic bangs, which could be the sound of Captain Patrick Sondheimer trying to break down the locked cockpit door. The video shows what appears to be part of the aircraft hitting the mountains, according to 'Bild'.

Investigators evaluating voice recorder data say co-pilot Andreas Lubitz allegedly locked his captain out of the cockpit and crashed the plane.

The new account also suggested Lubitz was wearing an oxygen mask. Both accounts said his breathing can be heard clearly as the plane plummets.

'Bild' online editor in chief Julian Reichelt is quoted in the paper as saying he personally has watched the video.

"The recording is from the cabin of the plane and shows, as far as we know, the last moments before it smashed into the mountain," Mr Reichelt said.

Regarding the video's authenticity, he added: "It is very shaky, it's very chaotic.

"But there are certain elements that match what we already know about the crash. "There are metal noises, which we believe to be hammering on the cockpit door.

"The plane plummets, people are panicking, they are screaming. Then something appears to hit the plane, or rather the plane appears to hit something, and it is briefly shaken. The screaming grows louder, and then the video ends."

'Bild' wrote that the video "was found at the scene of the tragedy by a person who belongs to the team of investigators". However, Jean-Marc Menichini, the French police official lieutenant-colonel, denied that investigators had found mobile phone footage at the crash site, telling CNN that the reports were "completely wrong" and "unwarranted".

'Paris Match' insisted that it stood by its report and said it has been "checked and rechecked". Lufthansa said it was aware of reports about the footage, but questioned whether a mobile phone could have withstood the impact. (© Daily Telegraph London)

Telegraph.co.uk

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in World News